Kenneth Wilson, Nobel winner for physics, dies

Jun 18, 2013

A physics professor who earned a Nobel prize for pioneering work that changed the way physicists think about phase transitions has died in Maine at age 77.

Kenneth Wilson was in the physics department at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., when he won the in 1982 for applying his research in to , the transformation that occurs when a substance goes from, say, liquid to gas. He created a mathematical tool that is still used in physics.

The son of a Harvard chemist, the Waltham, Mass., later retired from Ohio State University.

Wilson had been living in Gray, Maine. Friends and family say he died Saturday at a nursing home in Saco from complications of lymphoma.

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jsdarkdestruction
5 / 5 (1) Jun 18, 2013
farewell Kenneth, thank you for all you've done, may you rest in peace. I wish to offer my sympathies to his friends and family.

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