Robot discovers chambers under ancient Mexico temple

Apr 24, 2013
A view of the temple of the Feathered Serpent at the archaeological site of Teotihuacan, 45 kms northeast of Mexico City, on March 24, 2011. A small robot has discovered three possible burial chambers under the temple in Mexico's pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan, a find that may reveal secrets about funeral rituals in the ancient site.

A small robot has discovered three possible burial chambers under a temple in Mexico's pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan, a find that may reveal secrets about funeral rituals in the ancient site.

The robot, dubbed Tlaloc II-TC, located the chambers in the last section of a 2,000-year-old tunnel tucked under the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, surprising archeologists who had expected to find just one room.

The National Anthropology and History Institute said the find could shed light on the burial rituals of the rulers of Teotihuacan, which is some 40 kilometers (25 miles) from .

The mystery-filled ancient city is known for its majestic pyramids of the sun and the moon, but little is known about the people who inhabited the site. Teotihuacan, whose name means "City of Gods," had long been abandoned when Aztecs arrived in the area in the 1300s.

The tunnel under the Temple of Quetzacoatl, or Feathered Snake, was discovered after heavy rain uncovered a hole in the ground in 2003.

Tlaloc II-TC, named after the Aztec god of rain, was made to navigate and is equipped with an and a scanner that generates detailed maps.

The next step in the research will be to remove rubble blocking the last 30 meters (98 feet) of the 120-meter (394-foot) long tunnel, the anthropology institute said. believe the obstruction hides a staircase that goes down three to four meters deeper below ground.

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Argiod
1 / 5 (2) Apr 24, 2013
According to Mayans I've talked to when I vacationed in Mexico many years ago; the ancient kings were 'rejuvenated' every 52 years, along with the major temples. In the same fashion as the Phantom in the venerable old comic strip; they replaced the king with one of his offspring and buried him under the temple where nobody would ever find him again to dispute the young king's 'rejuvenation'. On tour you can go into the pyramid and see the face of the temple that was under the current facade. If you count the kings buried there, you will likely come up with a good estimate of how long the city was ruled in this manner. If there are only 3 chambers and 3 kings, then we can surmise maybe a 200 year rule, considering the fourth and last king may not have gotten the proper burial due to invasion.
barakn
5 / 5 (4) Apr 24, 2013
Well, what should we take on the first, the hearsay evidence or the fact that that the May didn't live in Teotihuacan?