Ecuador launches first homemade satellite

Apr 26, 2013

Ecuador launched its first satellite into space from China Friday morning, in a moment broadcast live on radio and television back home.

The "Pegaso" (Pegasus) nanosatellite, designed and built in Ecuador, set off aboard an at 0413 GMT from the Jiuquand station in .

Measuring just 10 by 10 by 75 centimeters (four by four by 30 inches), and weighing 1.2 kilograms (2.6 pounds), Pegaso will beam live video images back to Earth from an .

"Welcome to the heavens, Pegaso. Welcome to space Ecuador. The mission is a success," said Ronnie Nader, Ecuador's first and only astronaut, who runs Ecuador's civilian space agency.

The Ecuadoran Space Agency plans a second satellite launch in July.

Explore further: Research pair offer three possible models of Pluto ahead of New Horizons visit

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