Russia admits no new life form found in Antarctic lake

Mar 09, 2013
Russian researchers pose for a picture after reaching the subglacial Lake Vostok in Antarctica on February 5, 2012. Russian scientists on Saturday dismissed initial reports that they had found a wholly new type of bacteria in a mysterious subglacial lake in Antarctica.

Russian scientists on Saturday dismissed initial reports that they had found a wholly new type of bacteria in a mysterious subglacial lake in Antarctica.

Sergei Bulat of the genetics laboratory at the Saint Petersburg Institute of had said Thursday that samples obtained from the underground Lake Vostok in May 2012 contained a bacteria bearing no resemblance to existing types.

But the head of the genetics laboratory at the same institute said on Saturday that the strange life forms were in fact nothing but contaminants.

"We found certain specimen, although not many. All of them were contaminants" that were brought there by the lab during research, Vladimir Korolyov told the Interfax news agency.

"That is why we cannot say that previously-unknown life was found," he said.

Lake Vostok is the largest subglacial lake in Antarctica and scientists have long wanted to study its eco-system. The Russian team last year drilled almost four kilometres (2.34 miles) to reach the lake and take the samples.

Russia had been hoping to discover a new life form at the pristine site and the drilling was of major importance for the prestige to the country's science programme.

Russian leader was even given a sample of water after the drilling was performed.

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User comments : 18

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Lurker2358
3.6 / 5 (10) Mar 09, 2013
Wow.

From "New Life form unlike anything else" to a known contaminant life form.

How can they be so incompetent?

They were wrong on two points.
verkle
3.7 / 5 (6) Mar 09, 2013
The question still remains. Did they find any life in the lake down under?
Tausch
1.7 / 5 (7) Mar 09, 2013
Silly.
Short lived. Of course they found life.
You try living at absolute zero.
In superposition. The collapse of course led to life as already known.
Enough nonsense.
A sign of competence is recognizing and admitting mistakes.
MrVibrating
3 / 5 (6) Mar 09, 2013
..so just how much kerosene was dumped into this pristine environment in order to achieve this null result?
Maggnus
3 / 5 (2) Mar 09, 2013
How disaapointing! I predict a few rolling heads in the next couple of weeks.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Mar 09, 2013
Without statistics the value of prediction is useless.
rfw
1 / 5 (3) Mar 09, 2013
Downright F***ing STUPID!!!
GaryB
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 09, 2013
They probably contaminated the lake with sloppy methods. Thanks dudes.
ValeriaT
2.3 / 5 (6) Mar 09, 2013
Given the number of antifreeze, kerosene and silicon oil, which the Russians did use for drilling and which would contaminate the Vostok lake, I don't see very strange, when they did find nothing. These primitives struggled to become the first ones, who will make the hole - not the first, who will find something new in it - so they got no results. IMO they just looked for oil in Vostok lake all the time.
ScooterG
1 / 5 (3) Mar 09, 2013
To Siberia with the lot of them!
praos
1 / 5 (2) Mar 10, 2013
This giving bacteria to Putin won my heart.
praos
1 / 5 (4) Mar 10, 2013
This giving of bacteria to Putin won my heart.
deisik
1 / 5 (1) Mar 10, 2013
The question still remains. Did they find any life in the lake down under?


And a question pending - did they find any lake down there?
gopher65
not rated yet Mar 10, 2013
The question still remains. Did they find any life in the lake down under?


And a question pending - did they find any lake down there?

They haven't actually taken any proper samples yet. They just took some ice off the drill and tested that. It's not surprising that there were contaminants on it. Not only was it expected, it was previously reported! Then some nutbags from the lab claimed those same previously reported contaminants were "unknown samples".

Eeesh. I agree, heads will roll, haha.
ScooterG
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 10, 2013
Hey...get off the Ruskies backs. They were just trying to emulate the financially-lucrative AGW research industry.

To their credit, the Ruskies had the guts to admit their errors. The AGW research whores never will.
deisik
not rated yet Mar 10, 2013
They haven't actually taken any proper samples yet. They just took some ice off the drill and tested that. It's not surprising that there were contaminants on it


As far as I got it they did drill through the ice into the lake itself and then took the ice samples of the lake water (which was under pressure) after it had frozen in the shaft. This was done intentionally so as to avoid contamination of the lake


MarkyMark
1 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2013
. The AGW research whores never will.

As apposed to the @ickless bible Master-debaters such as yourself?
ScooterG
1 / 5 (2) Mar 11, 2013
. The AGW research whores never will.

As apposed to the @ickless bible Master-debaters such as yourself?


Wow...nothing will get a liberal stirred up faster than attacking his religion...

bwahahahahaha!

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