NZ court backs Dotcom's right to sue spy agency

Mar 07, 2013
Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom attends a press conference at his mansion in Auckland on January 20, 2013. An appeal court has backed Dotcom's right to sue New Zealand's foreign intelligence agency for illegally spying on him as part of a US probe into alleged online piracy.

An appeal court Thursday backed Megaupload boss Kim Dotcom's right to sue New Zealand's foreign intelligence agency for illegally spying on him as part of a US probe into alleged online piracy.

The Court of Appeal refused a government request to overturn a High Court decision in December that said he can seek damages from the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) over his treatment.

The ruling also means the GCSB will have to disclose to 's defence some details of information-sharing arrangements it had with foreign agencies, including US authorities, before the Internet tycoon's arrest in January 2012.

It emerged last September that the GCSB spied on Dotcom before armed police raided his Auckland mansion, even though he is a New Zealand resident and should have been off-limits to the agency.

Following the revelation, which prompted an apology from Prime Minister John Key, Dotcom applied to include the GCSB in a lawsuit he is planning against New Zealand police alleging wrongful arrest.

Dotcom's lawyers have not detailed how much compensation they want but opposition said the amount could be substantial.

US authorities allege Dotcom's Megaupload and related file-sharing sites netted more than US$175 million and cost copyright owners more than US$500 million by offering pirated copies of movies, TV shows and other content.

Dotcom, a German national who changed his name from Kim Schmitz, faces an hearing in August.

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Lurker2358
2.2 / 5 (5) Mar 07, 2013
US authorities allege Dotcom's Megaupload and related file-sharing sites netted more than US$175 million and cost copyright owners more than US$500 million by offering pirated copies of movies, TV shows and other content.


Stealing is wrong, but so is the 500% mark-up on all entertainment these days.

Movie stars and producers make at least ten times more money than they reasonably should anyway.

This type of piracy exists because a large portion of the population recognizes that the existing establishment and false "free market" is a rip-off.

Performers and actors don't deserve tens or hundreds of millions of dollars per year. They ARE NOT WORTH THAT and nobody is, except a few people in cutting edge science maybe.
extremity
2.5 / 5 (2) Mar 07, 2013
As much I hate to say it, I partially agree with lurker on this. Studios use the full resale price of movies to figure their losses. When it costs less than half that see it brand new in the theater, and $1.50 to rent at a kiosk, and a fraction of that for a streaming movie source like Netflix. Actually, I can watch a movie on 3 of these legitimate legal sources (at the theater, rental kiosk, and netflix) for cheaper than it is to buy a copy of the movie from the store. So their quoted losses are drastically overstated, and they are using "piracy" to try to compensate some of their losses on a lot of these movies they would have had anyway.
BrettC
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 07, 2013
I hate to say it but I disagree. The reason some actors make lots of money is simple. They perform a service for Millions of people at the same time. A plumber or electrician only performs a service to a few people at a time. The more people you perform a service to, the more opportunity for larger wages.
Egleton
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 08, 2013
The more people you perform a service to, the more opportunity for larger wages.

By that measure what should we pay the likes of Faraday or Flemming?
Entertainers entertain. They are performing no vital service at all.
They are just clowns and jugglers. Sports heroes are mere entertainers too. Listen closely the next time one is given the mike.
They are amusing, throw them a few tokens. Dont put them on a pedestal.