UK sends hand-held helicopter drones to war zone (Update)

Feb 04, 2013
Undated image released by the British Army Monday Feb 4 2013 of Sergeant Scott Weaver, of The Queens Royal Lancers launching a newly issued Black Hornet miniature surveillance helicopter during an operation in Afghanistan. The Scandinavian-designed Black Hornet Nano weighs as little as 16 grams (0.56 ounces)—the same as a finch. The four-inch-long (10-centimeter-long) helicopter is fitted with a tiny camera which relays still images and video to a remote terminal. Troops used the drone to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing. (AP Photo/ Sgt Ruper Frere)

British soldiers in Afghanistan have been issued with surveillance drones so small they can fit in the palm of a man's hand.

The Scandinavian-designed Black Hornet Nano weighs as little as 16 grams (roughly half an ounce)—the same as a finch. The 4-inch (10-centimeter) -long helicopter is fitted with a tiny camera which relays still images and video to a remote terminal.

"We used it to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing, which is a real asset," said Sgt. Christopher Petherbridge, with Britain's Brigade Reconnaissance Force. In a statement, he called the Hornet easy to operate and said it offered "amazing capability to the guys on the ground."

Undated image released by the British Army Monday Feb 4 2013 of a newly issued Black Hornet miniature surveillance helicopter in action during an operation in Afghanistan. The Scandinavian-designed Black Hornet Nano weighs as little as 16 grams (0.56 ounces)—the same as a finch. The four-inch-long (10-centimeter-long) helicopter is fitted with a tiny camera which relays still images and video to a remote terminal. Troops used the drone to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing. (AP Photo/ Sgt Ruper Frere)

The military said Sunday that the toy-like Hornet is capable of flying even in windy conditions.

It said the Hornet was developed by Norway's Prox Dynamics AS as part of a 20 million-pound ($31 million) contract for 160 units with southern England's Marlborough Communications Ltd.

Undated image released by the British Army Monday Feb 4 2013 of Sergeant Scott Weaver, of The Queens Royal Lancers launching a newly issued Black Hornet miniature surveillance helicopter during an operation in Afghanistan. The Scandinavian-designed Black Hornet Nano weighs as little as 16 grams (0.56 ounces)—the same as a finch. The four-inch-long (10-centimeter-long) helicopter is fitted with a tiny camera which relays still images and video to a remote terminal. Troops used the drone to look for insurgent firing points and check out exposed areas of the ground before crossing. (AP Photo/ Sgt Ruper Frere)

Drones of all shapes and sizes have rapidly become a mainstay of U.S., British and other nations' military operations around the world. Late last year the U.K. said it was doubling the size of its armed drone fleet in Afghanistan to 10 with the purchase of a new batch of Reapers.

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Sonhouse
4.7 / 5 (3) Feb 04, 2013
That must be some business to be in, $187,000 for each drone?
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Feb 04, 2013
The other side will probably counter with grenade laden quadcopters for 30 dollars a pop from amazon.
kochevnik
not rated yet Feb 04, 2013
I see a big market for drone-killers. Shouldn't be a big challenge. Simply target the biggest EM source in the sky
antialias_physorg
1 / 5 (1) Feb 05, 2013
Simply target the biggest EM source in the sky

I dunno. There are not that many guns that can reach the sun.