Tokyo man arrested over bizarre hacking campaign

Feb 10, 2013
An illustration photo of people using computers at an Internet cafe. Japanese police on Sunday arrested a man suspected of being behind a computer hacking campaign following an exhaustive hunt that at one stage had authorities tracking down a cat for clues, according to reports.

Japanese police on Sunday arrested a man suspected of being behind a computer hacking campaign following an exhaustive hunt that at one stage had authorities tracking down a cat for clues, according to reports.

Yusuke Katayama, 30, was arrested on charges of using a and sending a mass-killing threat to a comic book event after months of evading investigators with a series of vexing cyber-riddles, according to broadcaster NHK.

The channel aired footage of detectives escorting a chubby man with glasses into a police station.

He is believed to have sent numerous threats from computers around the country, including against a school and a kindergarten attended by grandchildren of Emperor Akihito.

The National Police Agency (NPA) was embarrassed after it emerged that officers had extracted "confessions" from four people who had nothing to do with the threats.

An anonymous hacker then sent messages to newspapers and broadcasters last month, with the sender claiming details of a used to dispatch the threats were strapped to a cat living on an island near Tokyo.

After cracking a set of riddles, police found the cat and removed a card from its collar which revealed a message saying "a past experience in a " had caused the hacker to act.

The message said the case "changed" the anonymous hacker's life, and added that "no more messages will be sent" local media reported.

Police analysed the memory card and footage taken by , coming to suspect that Katayama, a resident of Tokyo, was responsible for the hacking campaign, Jiji Press and other media said.

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User comments : 2

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MandoZink
5 / 5 (1) Feb 10, 2013
This reads like a script from a prime-time television crime drama. I really hope it doesn't turn out that the cat set him up. I have been online for years, this site included, with various cats sitting on my lap night after night. I'm not sure what they pick up on.

That being said, I admit I do not recall making many of the comments attributed to me on phys.org. I am typing this now only because they are all asleep at the moment. I am alone. I am going to check for a key-logger as soon as I post this.
rah
1 / 5 (1) Feb 11, 2013
Mando, you'll have to do better than that.
We haz pwned you long time.
All your computrz are belong to us.
Your cat.

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