First color image of Curiosity's tracks from orbit

February 1, 2013 by Jason Major, Universe Today
HiRISE image of Curiosity’s tracks, landing zone and the MSL rover at John Klein outcrop. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

As Curiosity prepares for the historic first drilling operation on Mars, the HiRISE camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured an image of it from 271 km (169 miles) up, along with twin lines of tracks and the blast marks from the dramatic rocket-powered descent back on August 6 (UTC).

The image here was acquired on Jan. 13, 157 of the MSL mission, as part of a dual HiRISE/CRISM observation of the landing site. According to The University of Arizona's HiRISE site it's the first time the rover's tracks have been imaged in color.

Her original landing site can be seen at the right edge. (Wait… did I just say "her?")

Orbital view (detail) of Curiosity at her drilling site in Yellowknife. Image was rotated so north is up. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

The pair of bright white spots in the HiRISE image show the area immediately below where 's rockets were pointed. Those areas were "blasted clean" and therefore show brightest. The larger dark scour zone is dark because the fine dust has been blown away from the area leaving darker materials, according to Ross A. Beyer, UofA HiRISE team.

can be seen as she (yes, it was confirmed today during ScienceOnline2013 that the rover—like all exploration vehicles—is a girl) was preparing for drilling into a rock outcrop called John Klein within the "Yellowknife" region in Gale Crater. Drilling is expected to begin today, Jan. 31.

Explore further: HiRISE Camera Shows Mojave Crater Peak is High and Dry

More information: See more news from the MSL mission here.

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4 comments

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deatopmg
1.5 / 5 (8) Feb 01, 2013
Amazing how NASA releases full resolution photos when it benefits their PR campaign but only releases highly compressed JPEG's (or other formats made from those JPEG's) to the paying public.

??Hiding anything??
FrankHerbert2
2.8 / 5 (13) Feb 01, 2013
You don't believe in Obama_socks (pirouette) giant semi-transparent martians, do you?

What exactly do you think NASA is hiding?
Bob_Kob
3.3 / 5 (4) Feb 01, 2013
I assume they're busy making money selling the other high-res photos..
VendicarE
4 / 5 (4) Feb 01, 2013
God Damn spectacular images. No wonder the Republicans want to destroy NASA.

"Hiding anything" - DeaTard

As a congenital liar DeaTard can't conceive of anyone else being open and honest.

It is completely unfathomable to him.

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