Slooh space camera to broadcast live feeds of super close Moon / Jupiter conjunction

Jan 19, 2013

On Monday, January 21st, the Moon will appear amazingly close in the sky to the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter. The waxing gibbous Moon—the lunar phase between first-quarter Moon and full Moon—will be approximately one degree south of Jupiter appearing to be only a pen width apart. This will be closest conjunction between the two celestial bodies until 2026.

Slooh will cover the event live on Slooh.com, free to the public, Monday, January 21st, at 6:00 p.m. PST / 9:00 p.m. EST / 02:00 UTC (1/22)—international times at http://goo.gl/xySeo—accompanied by real-time discussions with Slooh president Patrick Paolucci, Astronomy magazine columnist Bob Berman, and astro-imager Matt Francis of the Prescott Observatory. Viewers can watch live on their PC or iOS/Android mobile device at t-minus zero.

By , the Great Red Spot will be traveling across the middle of Jupiter's disk during Slooh's live broadcast.

If skies are clear, individuals can view the conjunction by looking at the Moon and finding the brightest "star" in the sky next to the Moon, which will be Jupiter. Individuals with binoculars or a telescope may capture more detail of Jupiter, including some of the satellites.

Explore further: Curiosity brushes 'Bonanza king' target anticipating fourth red planet rock drilling

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