DEM L50: Stellar effervescence on display

Jan 28, 2013
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Michigan/A.E.Jaskot, Optical: NOAO/CTIO/MCELS

(Phys.org)—This composite image shows the superbubble DEM L50 (a.k.a. N186) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud about 160,000 light years from Earth. Superbubbles are found in regions where massive stars have formed in the last few million years. The massive stars produce intense radiation, expel matter at high speeds, and race through their evolution to explode as supernovas . The winds and supernova shock waves carve out huge cavities called superbubbles in the surrounding gas.

X-rays from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory are shown in pink and optical data from the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) are colored in red, green and blue. The MCELS data were obtained with the University of Michigan's 0.9-meter Curtis Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The shape of DEM L50 is approximately an ellipse, with a supernova remnant named SNR N186 D located on its northern edge.

Like another superbubble in the LMC, N44 (see last year's image), DEM L50 gives off about 20 times more X-rays than expected from standard models for the evolution of superbubbles. A Chandra study published in 2011 showed that there are two extra sources of the bright X-ray emission: supernova striking the walls of the cavities, and hot material evaporating from the cavity walls.

The Chandra study of DEM L50 was led by Anne Jaskot from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The co-authors were Dave Strickland from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, Sally Oey from University of Michigan, You-Hua Chu from University of Illinois and Guillermo Garcia-Segura from Instituto de Astronomia-UNAM in Ensenada, Mexico.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra's science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

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Q-Star
1 / 5 (3) Jan 28, 2013
Effervescence ya say? Sure, anything to keep from saying the word PLASMA. I'm still fond of clouds of gas and molecules and dust. But the Universe is 99.999999999999 % PLASMA so they should just say it. PLASMA! PLASMA! PLASMA! (With the odd water-wave thrown in.)
Infinion
2.6 / 5 (5) Jan 28, 2013
here, have a cookie for attempted trolling

*cookie*
katesisco
1 / 5 (1) Jan 29, 2013
Well, isn't the reason we are dilly-dallying around with colliders and such because we are (still) looking for a way from gravity to magnetism?
I recently saw a site that brought shivers to my spine, revived talk about multi-verses. How will we ever progress with understanding of how things work if we can't stop tossing these red herrings out while we attempt to 'own' this tech we don't understand?