The Chandra X-ray Center operates under the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and is housed in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The initial Chandra Observatory projects included the Hubble Space Telescope launch in 1991. The Chandra X-ray Observatory satellite launched in 1999. Chandra advanced the entire field of astronomy and in particular X-ray astronomy. The Chandra X-ray Center monitors the Chandra satellite and has answered many scientific inquiries about supernovas, black holes, neutron stars and how these anomalies behave. Observations of pressure waves and shock waves around black holes, the Milky Way, galaxies, quasars and more. The Chandra X-ray Center shares information with interested scientists and other observatories. Media inquiries are welcome and timely updates of Chandra activity is posted on their Web site.

Address
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Chandra X-ray Center, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Website
http://chandra.harvard.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandra_X-ray_Observatory

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