Nationwide Insurance says data breach affects 1.1M

Dec 05, 2012

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. says someone attacked part of its computer network and likely stole personal information affecting more than 1.1 million people.

The Columbus, Ohio-based company says the Oct. 3 data breach occurred in a network also used by Allied Insurance. It has determined the compromised information included names, birth dates and and driver's license numbers for customers and others who sought insurance quotes.

Nationwide is sending letters notifying those affected and is offering them free credit monitoring and identity theft protection for a year. The insurer says it isn't aware of the compromised information being misused.

Nationwide is one of the world's biggest insurance and financial services companies. It says the breach was discovered the day it happened and was contained.

is investigating the breach.

Explore further: Social Security spent $300M on 'IT boondoggle'

More information: Nationwide's online notice: www.nationwide.com/notice.jsp

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