Iran media report new cyberattack by Stuxnet worm

Dec 25, 2012

(AP)—An Iranian semi-official news agency says there has been another cyberattack by the sophisticated computer worm Stuxnet, this time on the industries in the country's south.

Tuesday's report by ISNA quotes provincial civil defense chief Ali Akbar Akhavan as saying the virus targeted a power plant and some other industries in Hormozgan province in recent months.

Akhavan says Iranian computer experts were able to "successfully stop" the worm.

Iran has repeatedly claimed defusing cyber worms and malware, including Stuxnet and Flame viruses that targeted the vital oil sector, which provides 80 percent of the country's foreign revenue.

Tehran has said both worms are part of a secret U.S.-Israeli program that seeks to destabilize Iran's .

The West suspects Iran is pursuing a nuclear weapons program, a charge Tehran denies.

Explore further: LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Second computer worm 'hits Iran'

Apr 25, 2011

Iran has been hit with new malicious software as part of cyber attacks against the country, a military officer told Mehr news agency on Monday without specifying the target.

Iran claims computer worm is Western plot

Oct 05, 2010

(AP) -- Iran claimed Tuesday that a computer worm found on the laptops of several employees at the country's nuclear power plant is part of a covert Western plot to derail its nuclear program.

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

Apr 18, 2014

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

Apr 18, 2014

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Apr 18, 2014

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

xX_GT_Xx
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2012
Why hasn't anyone noticed that shortly after "capturing" a US drone, mysterious virus attacks occur? No one's ever heard of a trojan?
cmn
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2012
No one's ever heard of a trojan?


That's what SHE said! :)

No, really, it's unlikely their avenue of cyber attack was via an aerial drone. It would be much easier to get in via the internet or via some planted USB stick like they did last time.

Also, if we were going to attempt a(nother) cyber attack, we likely would use different software/methods than the one used last time.
fmfbrestel
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2012
An Iranian semi-official news agency says
whatever they are asked to say.

I'll bet $10 that no such cyber-attack happened, and that they are just using Stuxnet as a scapegoat for a human error that nobody wants to own up to.
zslewis
5 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2012
safe to assume none of you read the white paper released by Symantec. one of the components making stuxnet so amazing is its ability to be re-adapted and redeployed.....and there is no we. the -US- nor anyone else has taken credit for stuxnet...and lastly. Trojan?? you might as well not be reading this, for you have no idea what's going on.
BSD
1.8 / 5 (5) Dec 27, 2012
Iran media report new cyberattack by Stuxnet worm....
My heart bleeds for those arseholes.
baudrunner
1 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2012
Iran's another one of those countries whose names begin with "Ir", so no doubt this is probably just an inside job by some Iranian a-hole. The opportunity is too ripe and this is just too easy to get away with, isn't it? I mean, it's the West, right?

More news stories

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.