China's 8-core Godson processor details to be shared at IEEE forum

Nov 28, 2012 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org)—China's new 8-core Godson processor will be a key point of interest at the San Francisco IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) from Feb. 17 to 21. The Godson processor to be discussed at the event is a homegrown chip, to be launched for PCs and servers. The processor is a departure from Advanced Micro Devices and Intel designs. Interest will be in the chip itself and its message that, in this era, China is not be dismissed as a producer that re-produces without innovation but as a China focused on building its own ecosystem that can support its IT industry. The 8-core Godson-3B1500 is made using the 32-nanometer process and has 1.14 billion transistors.

This is a 40-watt Godson CPU that may be targeted for desktop, laptop or servers. The IDG News Service said the cores differ in design not only from the ARM CPUs in mobile devices and also from x86 CPUs from Intel and AMD used in PCs.

Godson is based on an MIPS64 CPU instruction set from MIPS and Android 4.1 has been ported to MIPS architecture. Unlike other CPUs, Godson chips do not support Windows OS. They run on variants of Linux. Information about the Godson-3B1500 will be described at the event in February, said the IDG report. The IEEE ISSCC is the flagship conference of the Solid-State Circuits Society, also described as the premier forum for advances in solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip.

Last year, IEEE Spectrum took notice of the processor's design, the work of which is led by Beijing-based chief architect Professor Weiwu Hu at the . "The Godson has an eccentric interconnect structure," this report said, for relaying messages among multiple . While Intel and IBM have worked on chips that shuttle communications merry-go-round style on a ring interconnect, the Godson connects cores using a version of the gridlike system, a . Architects elsewhere have commented on the mesh construct as an energy-saving design. The Godson 3B1500 has a clock speed of 1.35GHz, 172.8 gigaflops of performance, drawing 40 watts of power.

Research for the chip started in 2001-2002, with a 32-bit Godson-as the first CPU coming out of an initiative that is described as a "holistic" technology investment program, in that China's chip development efforts serve the goal of a hardware and software infrastructure that can reduce reliance on outside sources. Since 2008, chips based on 64-bit Godson CPU designs have been used in laptops. Last year, a supercomputer was announced with the ShenWei processor SW1600 based on the Godson CPU design.

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User comments : 42

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baudrunner
1.8 / 5 (10) Nov 28, 2012
ARM, MIPS, give me a break.
verkle
1.8 / 5 (5) Nov 28, 2012
The anyone else have a problem when typing into the "Add your comment" box using the "m" key? It happens to me like 30% of the time. When the problem happens, all other keys work, but as soon as hit the "m" key the view immediately changes to the top of the page, and of course the letter "m" doesn't get typed in.

The only way I know to get around this when it happens is to type (like I am doing) in another window, and then copy/paste into the "Add your comment" box.

Administrator---has anyone else reported this issue?

verkle
4 / 5 (8) Nov 28, 2012

The words "China's core..." hit me kind of strange. Since when does a country develop a chip? At least it should say something like "Chinese Institue" or the full name of "China Institute of Computing Technology". We don't say "USA Core" when talking about Intel.

Anyway, its too bad they chose MIPS, which is a technology on its way out. ARM has a much brighter future as a real core.
VendicarD
1.6 / 5 (5) Nov 28, 2012
While the Godsun 3B is a MIPS based design it has many extensions including x86 emulation instructions and a extra deep floating point register set kinda like the Intel MMX register extensions.

Within a couple of years AMD will be gone. Will Godsun take it's place?

Probably.
barakn
3.5 / 5 (13) Nov 28, 2012
Heck, why stop at that list of features, Vendicar? Why not mention the back door for the Chinese military?
VendicarD
2.2 / 5 (17) Nov 28, 2012
Hmmm... Who is more trustworthy when it comes to IT? China? Or the U.S. which has been caught red handed infecting computers for industrial espionage, to conduct cyber attacks on other nations, and most recently been caught infecting computers of the French Government for the purpose of spying.

I trust China more.
hyongx
1 / 5 (4) Nov 28, 2012
Unlike other CPUs, Godson chips do not support Windows OS. They run on variants of Linux.


Goodbye consumer market....
dtxx
1.9 / 5 (9) Nov 28, 2012
Hmmm... Who is more trustworthy when it comes to IT? China? Or the U.S. which has been caught red handed infecting computers for industrial espionage, to conduct cyber attacks on other nations, and most recently been caught infecting computers of the French Government for the purpose of spying.

I trust China more.


You would, moron. China has done things like required the install of gov't spyware on all citizens' comps and... you know what, never mind. Have fun when they drag you into the stadium for your public execution.
VendicarD
2.7 / 5 (7) Nov 29, 2012
China is still more trustworthy.
h20dr
4.2 / 5 (10) Nov 29, 2012
There isn't any need for name calling on this forum when you disagree with someone's opinion.
JohnAnderson2012
3.9 / 5 (11) Nov 29, 2012
"Hmmm... Who is more trustworthy when it comes to IT? China? Or the U.S. which has been caught red handed infecting computers for industrial espionage, to conduct cyber attacks on other nations, and most recently been caught infecting computers of the French Government for the purpose of spying"

The Chinese government goes after the computers of Americas' companies and government with an unbelievable zeal. I guess it's probably because they can't develop the technology themselves. They are too backward. Check out the book "America the Vulnerable" by Joel Brenner which details the Chinese's efforts in hacking our security systems and stealing technology.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (8) Nov 29, 2012
When the problem happens, all other keys work, but as soon as hit the "m" key the view immediately changes to the top of the page,

Happens when you hit Ctrl-m instead of shift-m.

The Chinese government goes after the computers of Americas' companies and government with an unbelievable zeal.

And you think the US doesn't? Would you expect it to be in US news if it did?

Hint: There are US military installations all over germany with directed antennas. Pointing WEST. Directly along lines used for directed radio communications used by german high tech companies.

Conspiracy theory? It would be if James Woolsey (ex head of the CIA) hadn't openly admitted to spying on the industry of 'allied' partners (which is a damn sight more shamful than what the Chinese are doing. At least THEY spy on the 'enemy')
VendicarD
4.2 / 5 (5) Nov 29, 2012
Johnnie doesn't even realize that virtually all of the components he used to write his tripe were made in China or elsewhere in the Pacific Rim.

"they can't develop the technology themselves." - JohnnieBoy

JohhieBoy just soiled his underpants. His countries department of FatherLand Security probably already knows.

While JohnnieBoy was composing is claptrap, his own country scans his posts and email looking for interesting keywords, and listen to his phone coversations looking for keywords.

If JohnnieBoy would like a list of those keywords I can provide a list of the more popular ones.

Modernmystic
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 29, 2012
And you think the US doesn't? Would you expect it to be in US news if it did?


And yet if two people commit a crime it's still a crime...isn't it. If two people commit a crime, and the crime isn't reported in the local papers of one of the parties...it's still a crime in BOTH cases.

Just to be clear.
JohnAnderson2012
2.2 / 5 (10) Nov 29, 2012
"JohhieBoy just soiled his underpants. His countries department of FatherLand Security probably already knows.

VendicarD what are you some Chinese gay? Anti-american bastard
JohnAnderson2012
1.9 / 5 (9) Nov 29, 2012
"Johnnie doesn't even realize that virtually all of the components he used to write his tripe were made in China or elsewhere in the Pacific Rim"

What little yellow VendicarD doesnt realize, is that all the products the Chinese make have US Patents. The importation of chinese goods into this country is part of a program sponsored by the government. Before 1975, we didnt import anything from any nation, much less China.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (6) Nov 29, 2012
And yet if two people commit a crime it's still a crime...isn't it.

No doubt. But if you're worrying about possible future spying by the Chinese and aren't actively worrying about current spying by the US - then your priorities are out of whack.
VendicarD
2.8 / 5 (9) Nov 29, 2012
"What little yellow VendicarD doesnt realize, is that all the products the Chinese make have US Patents." - JohnnieBoy

To protect the Chinese designs from being stolen by American Companies and other companies doing business in the U.S. and other nations that are adherents to American copyright rules.

Poor JohnnyBoy. He just can't figure out how the real world works.
VendicarD
2.7 / 5 (7) Nov 29, 2012
Poor, Confused JohnnyBoy thinks that international trade is a government program.

"The importation of chinese goods into this country is part of a program sponsored by the government." - JohnnyBoy

I suppose it is in the same sense that the cargo ships and international passenger travel is a government program.

Poor JohnnyBoy. He just can't figure out how the real world works.
VendicarD
4.2 / 5 (5) Nov 29, 2012
"Before 1975, we didnt import anything from any nation, much less China." - JohnnyBoy

JohnnyBoy is right on this one... Before 1975 the U.S. didn't import oil, or french wine, or Bananas. Before 1975 it was impossible to find a passion fruit, or a coconut, or a pine apple in Amreica.

Before 1975 Americans couldn't purchase commodore calculators from england, or Japanese built cars, or African Diamonds, or Swiss watches or Swiss Chocolate.

Before 1975, the U.S. didn't import newsprint from Canada, or Auto Parts from Ontario, or the CanadaArm crane used on the Space station and the shuttle.

Oh wait... None of that is right.

Poor JohnnyBoy. He just can't manage to figure out how the real world works.

JohnAnderson2012
2 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2012
"Poor, Confused JohnnyBoy thinks that international trade is a government program"

I don't know how old you are Ms. VendicarD, but before the Nixon Detente in the early '70's there was no trade with China. None. Everyone in the industry knows well that all the advanced products are designed here, not in China, and not so often in Japan.

"No doubt. But if you're worrying about possible future spying by the Chinese and aren't actively worrying about current spying by the US - then your priorities are out of whack."

Lets be clear, one has our western interests in hand, the other....has its eyes set upon stealing everything it can so it can copy it, "to make nation stronger". Kind of like the insidious terminator machine.
VendicarD
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 29, 2012
Are you saying that the U.S. is a criminal nation?

"And yet if two people commit a crime it's still a crime...isn't it." - ModernMystic

If so, then I strongly agree with you.
JohnAnderson2012
1 / 5 (5) Nov 29, 2012
"JohnnyBoy is right on this one... Before 1975 the U.S. didn't import oil, or french wine, or Bananas. Before 1975 it was impossible to find a passion fruit, or a coconut, or a pine apple in Amreica. Before 1975 Americans couldn't purchase commodore calculators from england, or Japanese built cars, or African Diamonds, or Swiss watches or Swiss Chocolate. Before 1975, the U.S. didn't import newsprint from Canada, or Auto Parts from Ontario, or the CanadaArm crane used on the Space station and the shuttle. Oh wait... None of that is right."

Although we have always had trade with Canada, as far as International trade is concerned, not anywhere near the amount of goods were imported then as are imported today. Look at the trade numbers yourself. You could say our imports are a welfare program designed to assist the 3rd world countries, however, most economist prefer to call it "specialization".
VendicarD
3 / 5 (2) Nov 29, 2012
Sad little JohnnyBoy. He can't seem to figure out that when the U.S. trades with Canada, it is by definition, international trade.

Oh well...

He id right on one thing, when Ronald Reagan and the Republican traitors in Congress started their war against the American working middle class, their policies began and sustained a massive transfer of American manufacturing jobs to second and third world nations.

The claim was continually made by Republicans that it was unpatriotic to claim that American workers could not compete against 50 cents a day labor in Niger, and that there would be no race to the bottom in terms of wages, or workplace standards, and that the highly educated American workforce would simply transition to the IT sector as everyone wrote database applications for each other.

Sadly it turned out for America that the rest of the world was more educated than the American worker, and if only American Republicans had a high school level of education they would CONT
VendicarD
1 / 5 (1) Nov 29, 2012
they would have realized that for themselves.

JohnnyBoy insists that there is no industrial design work being done in China.

He maintains this position when responding to an article which documents the Chinese design of a new revision of a 1 billion transistor CPU that is scheduled to be exploited in the construction of Chinese designed and built Supercomputers.

JohnnyBoy's mindlessness boggles my mind.

How does he manage to feed himself?
JohnAnderson2012
2.1 / 5 (7) Nov 29, 2012
well, I would disagree on "less educated Americans". Americans have some of the highest IQ's in the world, the best universities the brightest scientist and entrepreneurs. As far as loss of manufacturing jobs, yeah, that is true, however, I think you would do well to take a class on International Trade where they discuss market-SHARE, and specialization. We provide services such as design, finance, etc, they provide manufacturing in some industries we don't any more.
JohnAnderson2012
2.3 / 5 (6) Nov 29, 2012
"JohnnyBoy insists that there is no industrial design work being done in China. Poor, sad JohnnyBoy, How does he manage to feed himself? JohnnyBoy's mindlessness boggles my mind."

Mindlessness? Grow up in an African Zoo? There is no need to get unruly Miss Vendicar.

I didn't say there was no design work done in China. And that is where you're missing the point completely. It isn't that they don't do some design work, it is that the majority of their products are based on copies of products originally made in the USA/UK/Japan/Germany, some of which were covertly "borrowed".
VendicarD
3 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2012
The proof is not only in the sudies that document it very well, but also in the economic pudding.

"well, I would disagree on "less educated Americans"" - JohnnyBoy

"Americans have some of the highest IQ's in the world, the best universities the brightest scientist and entrepreneurs." - JohnnyBoy

America his it's share of intellectual elites - mostly imported from other countries.

American universities are still top notch, but if you visit any engineering or mathematics class you will find it populated almost exclusively by non-Americans, Principally Asians.

VendicarD
5 / 5 (2) Nov 29, 2012
The last corn broom manufacturer in America left for Mexico a decade ago.

Earlier this month, Hostess decided to follow them.

"We provide services such as design, finance, etc, they provide manufacturing in some industries we don't any more." - JohnnyBoy

The last TV manufacturer in the U.S. left 25 years ago.

And on and on it goes.

China's IC design houses become significant players

China's IC design industry grew 38% during 2001-2009 with a 15% leap in 2009 alone according to a report from www.researchandmarkets.com.

Electronics Weekly
JohnAnderson2012
3.4 / 5 (5) Nov 29, 2012
"Today an army of hackers in China routinely scour the networks of US corporations in search of intellectual property trade secrets. The CEO of security firm Mandiant adds, 'My biggest fear is that in 10 years China will be making everything we were making-for half the price-because they've stolen all our innovations.'"

Fortune Magazine - 1/16/12 pg 46
VendicarD
2 / 5 (8) Nov 29, 2012
There is no such thing as "intellectual property", JohnnyBoy.

It is an illegitimate concept, that only losers whine about.
JohnAnderson2012
2.6 / 5 (5) Nov 30, 2012
"There is no such thing as "intellectual property", JohnnyBoy. It is an illegitimate concept, that only losers whine about."

Sincerely, Ms. Bendicar

of course there is. It is a white and black issue, for sure. The next time you put a thousand hours into a software product that some loser chinese hacker steals, or maybe in your case, 1000 hours writing a newspaper article, building a drug, or even an entire genome, which is then stolen by a chinese, robbing you of your money rights, I think you would see it differently. That's the problem with academics, journalists and others such as yourself. You don't know what an investment in time and money is in the real world.
JohnAnderson2012
1 / 5 (5) Nov 30, 2012
"America his it's share of intellectual elites - mostly imported from other countries. American universities are still top notch, but if you visit any engineering or mathematics class you will find it populated almost exclusively by non-Americans, Principally Asians. "

Miss Vendicar

Asians with scholarships given to them by Americans who are mostly white. They don't have schools like that where they come from, so they have to use our schools, to our detriment. China is a welfare project which Americans contribute to.

"America his it's share of intellectual elites - mostly imported from other countries."

Ms. Vendicar

America wins most noble prizes, and most of those Americans were born here. If you're so anti-american why don't you just stay over there then and not ship all your goods and people here?
Modernmystic
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2012
There is no such thing as "intellectual property", JohnnyBoy.


Ask the native Americans how well it worked out for them when they stamped their feet and insisted that it was illegitimate to own land...

The fact is that a "right" exists if someone with enough guns will enforce it, and since America has more guns than anyone else, intellectual property rights do in fact exist in an extremely real way.

Now if you want to discuss ethics...discuss away, but don't continue to insist the sky isn't blue.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.8 / 5 (11) Nov 30, 2012
JohnnyBoy is right on this one... Before 1975 the U.S. didn't import oil, or french wine, or Bananas. Before 1975 it was impossible to find a passion fruit, or a coconut, or a pine apple in Amreica.
Uh pineapples used to come from hawaiian plantations worked by underpaid coolies. From china.
http://adventurei...odiiMA9w
Ask the native Americans how well it worked out for them when they stamped their feet and insisted that it was illegitimate to own land...
Religionists invoked Manifest Destiny and decided that amerindians had no right to the promised land. This has been done before to similar effect.
JohnAnderson2012
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 30, 2012
"The fact is that a "right" exists if someone with enough guns will enforce it, and since America has more guns than anyone else, intellectual property rights do in fact exist in an extremely real way."

Obviously, the rules exist due to international treaty, these include treaties which China signed in order to gain acceptance to the WTO.
JohnAnderson2012
2 / 5 (5) Nov 30, 2012
"JohhieBoy just soiled his underpants. His countries department of FatherLand Security probably already knows."

Ms. VendicarD

Miss Vendicar, I don't give one damn what my countries homeland security department knows about. They exist to serve me, not the other way around.
PinkElephant
5 / 5 (4) Dec 01, 2012
@JohnAnderson2012,

Are you living in the 1950's or something? You think calling someone "gay", "yellow", or "Ms." somehow insults them more than it debases you?
I don't give one damn what my countries homeland security department knows about.
Apparently you don't give a damn about your country's Constitution, whose 4th amendment guarantees your privacy and safety in "papers and effects" -- which, translated into modern era, includes electronic and audio communications not intended for public consumption -- against search or seizure without a court-approved warrant documenting probable cause. You don't care about creeping Fascism, as long as you think it "serves you"??? LMAO Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely, and those who wish to trade freedom for security in the end will be left with neither.

Yes, China is waging economic war on U.S. and the West. And our captains of government and industry help them do it, not as "welfare" but as acts of High Treason.
Kahzei
2 / 5 (2) Dec 02, 2012
John and Otto are a disgrace to our great nation.
Errin
not rated yet Dec 07, 2012
To say China is a welfare state would be taking it too far. Yet, John has some good points about Chinese cyber terrorists. Not a lot of the respondents in this forum seem to be taking this issue seriously. He is right, in that China needs to be brought into the 21st century, while discontinuing its' policy of relying on the West for technological advances, education and economy.
VendicarD
5 / 5 (1) Dec 08, 2012
You keep telling yourself that, the next time they fondle the contents of your pants and force you to take off your shoes.

"Miss Vendicar, I don't give one damn what my countries homeland security department knows about. They exist to serve me, not the other way around." - JohnnyBoy
rom9
not rated yet Dec 12, 2012
I do not understand the paranoia of China. Do the people who say such things realize that the very PC they are typing from is probably made in China. Any country that wants to dominate world politics does spying. It is currently US and of course with increasing power China will follow. Don't be a bigot; power corrupts everyone white, black, brown or yellow !!

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