Space shuttle Endeavour stuck at home in Florida

Sep 17, 2012 by Marcia Dunn
This photo provided by NASA shows space shuttle Endeavour atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The beginning of Endeavour's final flight to California has been postponed because of weather along the flight route. NASA had planned for the 747 carrying the shuttle to take off from Kennedy Space Center on Monday. (AP Photo/NASA, Bill Ingalls)

(AP)—Space shuttle Endeavour apparently doesn't want to leave home.

NASA's youngest shuttle was supposed to depart Florida's Kennedy Space Center on Monday for its permanent museum home in Los Angeles. But stormy weather along the Gulf of Mexico nixed the travel plans until Wednesday morning.

The shuttle will be bolted to the top of a modified jumbo jet when it leaves Florida.

Endeavour will stop off in Houston, home to Mission Control, and fly low over NASA facilities en route. After a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in California, it will arrive at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, a day later than planned.

Endeavour, which retired last year, will go on display at the California Science Center.

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