Sorghum eyed as a southern bioenergy crop

Sep 17, 2012 by Jan Suszkiw
Sorghum eyed as a southern bioenergy crop
ARS researchers are developing ways to improve sorghum's potential as a source for biofuel, including crossbreeding cultivated sorghum with an African sorghum bicolor species. Photo courtesy of Richard Old, XID Services, Inc., Bugwood.org

Sweet sorghum is primarily grown in the United States as a source of sugar for syrup and molasses. But the sturdy grass has other attributes that could make it uniquely suited to production as a bioenergy crop, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) studies suggest.

Sorghum is an ideal candidate because of its , adaptability to diverse growing conditions, low requirements, and high biomass (plant material) content, according to Scott Sattler and collaborator Jeff Pedersen with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS). It also produces soluble sugar that can be converted to biofuel. Residual fibers left over from the juice extraction process also can be burned to generate electricity.

Sattler and Pedersen's studies of sorghum are part of a larger effort by ARS—USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency—to answer a government mandate calling for the production of up to 36 billion gallons of biofuel by 2022. Approximately 15 billion gallons of that total will come from grain ethanol, with the remaining 21 billion gallons to come from other sources, or "feedstocks," including sorghum, sugarcane, other grasses like switchgrass, and oilseed crops like rapeseed and soybean.

Sorghum and sugarcane are top candidates for production in the southeastern United States because they are complementary crops that can extend the biofuel production season and utilize the same equipment, note Sattler and Pedersen, who work at the ARS Grain, Forage and Bioenergy Research Unit in Lincoln, Neb. However, they are not the only team examining 's energy potential.

At the ARS and Unit in Tifton, Ga., geneticist William Anderson and his colleagues are working to identify desirable sweet sorghum genes and their functions so improved varieties can be developed. In studies, they selected 117 genotypes from the ARS sorghum germplasm collection at Griffin, Ga., and evaluated them for their ability to mature quickly and resist fall armyworms and the fungal disease anthracnose.

Explore further: First sex determining genes appeared in mammals 180 million years ago

More information: Read more about this and other bioenergy research in the September 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

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