'Nice to be right', says Higgs after particle milestone (Update)

Jul 06, 2012
British scientist Peter Higgs poses for pictures after addressing a press conference at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Higgs who gave his name to what is likely to be the Higgs boson particle spoke of his delight at the discovery, saying it was "nice to be right sometimes".

The British scientist who gave his name to the Higgs boson particle spoke Friday of his delight after researchers affirmed its existence, saying it was "nice to be right sometimes".

Professor Peter Higgs was making his first detailed public comments since researchers at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced Wednesday they believe they have found the sub-atomic particle thought to confer mass on matter.

The announcement came following nearly 50 years of research after Higgs published the conceptual groundwork for the elusive boson, dubbed the "God particle" because it is powerful and everywhere in 1964.

Asked at a press conference at Edinburgh University if he now felt a sense of vindication, Higgs said: "It's very nice to be right sometimes... it has certainly been a long wait."

The 83-year-old also brushed off suggestions he would now be in the running for a Nobel Prize as a result of the discovery.

"I don't know, I don't have close friends on the Nobel committee," he said, when questioned about an honour which academics including Professor Stephen Hawking have suggested he should receive.

He also declined to comment on whether those awarding the Nobel Prize should change its rules so that more than three people can share the award.

This would allow the committee to recognise his work alongside that of the five others with whom he worked most closely on his research.

"It remains for the Nobel committee if they are interested in this result to see if they really have a problem," Higgs said.

Later, Higgs's friend and colleague Alan Walker recounted the low-key celebration they held after learning of the breakthrough, one of the most important scientific discoveries of recent years.

Walker said he and Higgs were flying home from CERN in Geneva this week on budget airline easyJet when he offered Higgs a glass of Prosecco sparkling wine so they could toast the discovery.

Higgs replied: "'I'd rather have a beer' and popped a can of London Pride," Walker said.

Higgs added that he has not contributed to theoretical physics since the mid-1980s, when he became "too old".

"I couldn't, at that age, acquire sufficient new mathematical skills which were needed to contribute, so I stopped," he said.

Asked what he was going to do next, Higgs told reporters he was simply looking forward to continuing his retirement.

"The only problem, I think, will be that I shall have to dodge the press," he quipped.

Meanwhile, Edinburgh University, where he is Emeritus Professor of Physics, announced Friday that it was naming a new centre for theoretical physics after Higgs.

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ant_oacute_nio354
Jul 06, 2012
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Shinichi D_
4.8 / 5 (19) Jul 06, 2012
The mass is the electric dipole moment. Higgs doesn't exist.

He exists. Look at the pictures. :)
TabulaMentis
1.5 / 5 (8) Jul 06, 2012
As one Physorg.com member mentioned, where is Bose in all of the articles.
baudrunner
4.4 / 5 (7) Jul 06, 2012
This particle is a neutral fermion.
This has got to be one of the stupidest comments ever posted on this site. The Higgs particle is a boson, to be sure. It hangs around for about a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second before it decays, and it has not yet been established what the decay particles are just yet. Ultimately, there will be fermions generated, but which ones and how many we don't know yet.
tekknerd
1 / 5 (1) Jul 06, 2012
I'm confused (not a scientist). How can there be a Higgs field if the Higgs boson only exists for a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second, and then only created in crazy particle smashers?
Richardmcsquared
4.5 / 5 (2) Jul 06, 2012
The Higgs (assuming it is) Is a massive boson round about 130 times the size of a proton ( thats a lot of energy -relatively speaking- )being so large it can and does decay into the things that exist of lower energies , .The field itself is part of reality , along with the electromagnetic , gravitational and nuclear forces all of which can be manipulated and all of which have a boson , which is the carrier or mediator of each force , we dont know about gravity yet but its thought maybe gravitons would be the boson for that . The electromagnetic boson is the photon and lasts long enough to be seen because it is massless so it does not decay , Hope that helps a little Tekknerd .
Parsec
not rated yet Jul 06, 2012
I'm confused (not a scientist). How can there be a Higgs field if the Higgs boson only exists for a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second, and then only created in crazy particle smashers?

This is actually a good question. The answer is that all particles are created in the vacuum along with their anti-particles. These then mutually annihilate almost instantly. So all particles are actually flying through a soup of Higg's bosons, which interact with it and give them mass. The amount of interaction determines the mass.
EvgenijM
1 / 5 (1) Jul 06, 2012
Is Higgs field a substance that fills space? If so, does that mean that we just confirmed another ether theory?
Deesky
5 / 5 (4) Jul 07, 2012
Is Higgs field a substance that fills space? If so, does that mean that we just confirmed another ether theory?

No. Aether was proposed because at the time it wasn't understood how light could propagate without a medium. Observations nixed that. It also violated special relativity (SR) because it presupposed a fixed reference frame of the aether against which everything moved. But in SR there exists no absolute reference frame. SR/GR are amongst the most successful theories in physics.

The Higgs field comes from quantum field theory (QFT) describing the interactions of elementary particles. All QFTs are consistent with SR and therefore the Higgs field is also consistent with SR.

The Higgs field and the Aether are really very different.
julianpenrod
1.2 / 5 (12) Jul 07, 2012
"Science" devotees, those who promote the sentiment that only "science" is right and that "scientists" never lie, tend very often to display an incredible ignorance of the very subject they purport to talk about. And yet, other purported devotees give them unlimited approval is all they do is display their ignorance using technical language that, eventually, agrees with what the New World Order demands they believe. baudrunner says the Higgs is definitely a boson, even though it supposedly lasted billionths of billionths of a second, and "it has not been established what the decay particles are". How do you know it even existed then? It was around too short a time to be seen, and they don't know what it decayed into, yet they know it was there, its weight and that it was a boson? And five people gave baudrunner five stars?
MarkyMark
5 / 5 (1) Jul 07, 2012
As one Physorg.com member mentioned, where is Bose in all of the articles.

Bose is doing very well in the music audio buisness.
baudrunner
3 / 5 (2) Jul 07, 2012
julianpenrod: The Higgs boson was predicted using the mathematics of quantum physical theory, which, for the layman, essentially translates as being the study of events that occur at discrete threshold energies, such as the thermal energies of fractional distillation; the distinct bands that represent the colors in the visible range of the optical spectrum; and of course the very discrete energies required to effect the energy level changes of the electron. With his generous understanding of quantum theory, Higgs calculated that at an energy input of about 126 GeV (giga electron volts), we would observe the realization of another massive boson, like the W and W- bosons. These bosons are charge carriers - energy bundles really, and not particles per se. But their final decay products ultimately stick around as the subatomic particles that make up our reality, ie quarks and leptons. Study the Standard Model here: http://baudrunner...del.html
Smashin_Z_1885
1 / 5 (5) Jul 08, 2012
There is no "higg's boson" particle. It does not exist, pure and simple. However, it would be embarrassing to say such, for the people who, for many years, have kept swearing up and down that it MUST exist, or our math is wrong and would have to be re-calculated. The fact of the matter is, if you manipulate data enough, you can get the answers you are looking for. This is the case here, as there is no such thing as a "higg's boson" particle. Our research and data clearly disproves it, without a doubt.
Smashin_Z_1885
1 / 5 (5) Jul 09, 2012
One other thing that irritates me, is that they have just recently decided to expose the existence of X points, but, claim they are of no use or value at the Earth's surface. 1. ANY information concerning X points should not have been released to the public just yet. 2. They release this information, then apparently try to cover their tracks concerning the practical use of such things by claiming they exist far above the atmosphere, and are of no valid use. Hogwash! 3. As long as the information is out now, it may as well be stated that they do in fact exert effects upon the Earth's surface, and, are certainly in use as we speak (some refer to them as 'grid points', and CIMMV (core integrated magnetic monopole vortices). So there, now you know.
TabulaMentis
1 / 5 (1) Jul 09, 2012
Bose is doing very well in the music audio buisness.
Very funny, you spelled the word "business" wrong. Normally science writers will provide a little history about their subject and Satyendra Bose should have been mentioned in the article, IMO.

http://en.wikiped...ath_Bose
TabulaMentis
1.5 / 5 (2) Jul 09, 2012
Is Higgs field a substance that fills space?
Higgs field is not a substance, but it does fill all of space as part of spacetime fabric and dark energy.
TabulaMentis
1 / 5 (1) Jul 09, 2012
The field itself is part of reality, along with the electromagnetic, gravitational and nuclear forces all of which can be manipulated and all of which have a boson, which is the carrier or mediator of each force, we don't know about gravity yet but its thought maybe gravitons would be the boson for that. The electromagnetic boson is the photon and lasts long enough to be seen because it is massless so it does not decay.
Why would the graviton not be a boson, unless you are talking about one-dimensional gravity.