Estimate: A new Amish community is founded every three and a half weeks in US

Jul 27, 2012 by Emily Caldwell

A new census of the Amish population in the United States estimates that a new Amish community is founded, on average, about every 3 1/2 weeks, and shows that more than 60 percent of all existing Amish settlements have been founded since 1990.

This pattern suggests the Amish are growing more rapidly than most other religions in the United States, researchers say. Unlike other religious groups, however, the growth is not driven by converts joining the faith, but instead can be attributed to large families and high rates of baptism.

In all, the counts almost 251,000 Amish in the United States and Ontario, Canada, dispersed among 456 settlements, the communities in which members live and worship. The 1990 census estimated that there were 179 settlements in the United States.

If the growth of the Amish population continues at its current rate, the Ohio State University researchers predict that the census could exceed 1 million Amish and 1,000 settlements shortly after 2050, and these numbers will bring economic, cultural, social and religious change to the rural areas that attract Amish settlement.

Among the changes the researchers predict: Amish will buy up land vacated by farmers in close to community services, but the availability of might not keep pace with . This means many Amish men will likely look for nonfarm jobs such as woodworking and construction trades, which could affect land prices and potentially enhance local economies through the establishment of business startups.

The census restricts the count to Amish among the "Old Orders," those who maintain a horse-and-buggy lifestyle and avoid or limit their use of most modern technologies.

The researchers who compiled the census used a variety of sources to produce this count, including current and archival settlement directories and statistics from publications that cover some of the largest Amish communities, as well as by calculating estimates based on research-based facts about Amish settlement characteristics.

It took about two years to develop the census, which was commissioned by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies for the recently released 2010 U.S. Religion Census.

"The Amish are one of the fastest-growing religious groups in North America," said Joseph Donnermeyer, professor of rural sociology in Ohio State's School of Environment and Natural Resources, who led the census project. "They're doubling their population about every 21 to 22 years, primarily because they produce large families and the vast majority of daughters and sons remain in the community as adults baptized into the faith, starting their own families and sustaining their religious beliefs and practices."

Donnermeyer compiled the count with Elizabeth Cooksey, professor of sociology, and Cory Anderson, a graduate student in rural sociology, both at Ohio State. Anderson presented a paper today (7/27) in Chicago at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society.

The researchers describe the Amish as largely misunderstood based on their limited depiction on television reality shows or in the news media. The Amish represent a branch of the Anabaptist (or rebaptized) movement dating to the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century. Based on their interpretation of the Christian bible, the Amish settle where they can separate themselves from the world, minimize disturbance from others and use the land for farming or other livelihoods, Donnermeyer said.

The church is central to Amish life and is intentionally small-scale in its organization in keeping with their religious philosophy of separation, Donnermeyer said. Larger settlements are composed of multiple church districts, which typically consist of a few dozen families whose baptized members use a lottery system to select leaders. Worship services are held in members' homes.

The absence of a centralized church registry makes it complicated to produce an accurate estimate of the Amish population, Donnermeyer noted, but he said this census is likely the most comprehensive scholarly count of the Amish population to date.

He and his colleagues relied on more than 60 settlement directories they obtained from the Heritage Historical Library operated by the Mennonite Church and three publications that cover news about various Amish communities, both large and small. Those publications are The Budget in Sugarcreek, Ohio, The Diary in Bart, Pa., and Die Botschaft in Millersburg, Pa.

The researchers also used demographic data from established settlements to produce average household estimates for newer or similar communities that had not published directories. A settlement, by definition, must contain at least three households and include members who are able to hold a church service; these criteria were the basis for estimating the population of settlements that were less than a year old.

Baptism into the Amish church is offered only to adults – a fundamental tenet of the Anabaptist movement. Of the 250,784 Amish adherents identified in the census, 145,235 are considered nonmembers because they are children who have not yet been baptized.

The census provides Amish population figures for each state with at least one Amish community. The researchers included Ontario, Canada, home to 15 settlements and almost 4,400 Amish, in the census. The Amish live in 29 states, mostly in the Midwest and Great Lakes region but also as far south as Florida and Texas, into the northeast reaches of Maine and as far west as western Montana.

According to the research, Ohio is home to the most Amish community members – 60,233 – and Pennsylvania is a close second, with 59,078 Amish residents. Indiana has 44,831 Amish citizens. The 456 settlements contain a total of 1,868 Amish church districts of the "Old Orders."

No state has seen more recent growth in settlements than New York, where 15 new settlements have been established since 2010. But 34 of Ohio's 54 settlements have been founded since 1990, a trend that contributes to the state's large Amish population, Donnermeyer said. Ohio is also home to Holmes County, the U.S. county housing the highest percentage of Amish, with 42 percent. The Greater Holmes County settlement, which sprawls across six counties (Holmes, Wayne, Tuscarawas, Coshocton, Stark and Ashland), is the largest settlement, with nearly 30,000 Amish, followed by the Lancaster/Chester County settlement in southeastern Pennsylvania.

"My guess is that in 15 years, we'll witness a county whose population is majority Amish, and Holmes County is likely to gain that distinction first. Perhaps LaGrange County in Indiana will not be far behind," Donnermeyer said.

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Lurker2358
2.7 / 5 (7) Jul 27, 2012
Donnermeyer said. Larger settlements are composed of multiple church districts, which typically consist of a few dozen families whose baptized members use a lottery system to select leaders. Worship services are held in members' homes.


Intended to minimize corruption, based on 2 or 3 Biblical examples, one New Testament. The assumption would be that any bias in such a system must come from "providence" or the will of God himself.

I'm actually impressed, since most other protestant denominations tend to select their leaders based on charisma, wealth, "inheritance" of an elder's ministry, or other popularity traits which hypocritically promotes abuse and corruption.

This also "looks" a bit more like Biblical examples.

However, I am concerned for these families as they risk alienating themselves more and more so as to become socially irrelevant, like some lost tribe in the Amazon or Peru.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (35) Jul 27, 2012
"The researchers describe the Amish as largely misunderstood based on their limited depiction on television reality shows or in the news media..."

-So lets strive to understand them.

"the German Peasants' War in southern Germany in 1525...have been seen as laying the foundation for the Anabaptist movement."

-Hmm. Began in rebellion...

"To the radicals, the council had no right to make that decision, but rather the Bible was the final authority of church reform."

-Typical contrarian screed...

"bring religious, political, and economical reform through a violent peasant uprising..."

-Violence...

"ideas were indirectly related to the Münster Rebellion..."

-More violence...

"persecution and expansion..."

MORE violence...

"Roman Catholics and Protestants alike persecuted the Anabaptists, resorting to torture and execution..."

-Martyrdom... the worst sort of violence...
cont>
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (35) Jul 27, 2012
"the persecution and execution of thousands of Anabaptists in various parts of Europe between 1525 and 1660. Continuing persecution in Europe was largely responsible for the mass emigrations..."

-MORE VIOLENCE. I wonder why?

"They're doubling their population about every 21 to 22 years, primarily because they produce large families"

Ah. Of course.
http://en.wikiped...ing_time

-What does growth rate mean in other regions? http://en.wikiped...n_growth

-Note that those areas experiencing the most poverty, suffering, violence and unrest are the ones whose populations are growing the fastest.

So... the amish. Forged in violence, distinguished by radicalism and explosive growth. But theyre not violent NOW are they? http://www.huffin...118.html

-What does god think I wonder?
http://www.foxnew...ylvania/
Lurker2358
4.2 / 5 (10) Jul 27, 2012
Ghost:

Rebellions happen for a reason, usually associated with tyrannical political or religious leaders. That's one of the primary reasons independent sects from all religious and political backgrounds left England and other parts of Europe, which is to get as far away from the immediate influence of the Monarchies and established churches as possible.

1525 was in or near the Inquisition era, anyone at odds with the Catholic Church, in any minor detail, was typically murdered or persecuted, especially in Spain but also to a lesser extent elsewhere. Heck, they even put Columbus on trial for the "crime" of being a Jew after discovering his ships log reported an unexplained lights sighting!!

I've never heard of any Ammish terror plots or other aggression against the U.S. or state or world governments, if any have happened it isn't recently, though they have the stigma of being paranoid of outsiders, that doesn't make them guilty of violence or necessarily any other crime or wrong.
Lurker2358
4.2 / 5 (10) Jul 27, 2012
"This is very odd and clearly outlier behavior," he wrote to HuffPost. "Amish-on-Amish violences is extremely rare. ... These appear to be malicious assaults on symbols of Amish identity by a wacko little group.


Ghost you should have read the entire article.

Perhaps if you weren't so "anti-everything," when it comes to religious issues, you'd actually learn something about those issues.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (36) Jul 27, 2012
Rebellions happen for a reason, usually associated with tyrannical political or religious leaders.
No, they are usually a response to deprivation; lack of necessities brought about by population growth. Majorities blame minorities, most often the fastest-growing ones. Like the anabaptists. Or the jews. Or moslems in many communities in the west.
I've never heard of any Ammish terror plots or other aggression against the U.S. or state or world governments
Not yet. They are human, and they read the same holy book they did back in 1525, which tells them to martyr themselves as needed. And they have pitchforks.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.4 / 5 (37) Jul 27, 2012
"This is very odd and clearly outlier behavior," he wrote to HuffPost. "Amish-on-Amish violences is extremely rare. ... These appear to be malicious assaults on symbols of Amish identity by a wacko little group.
Pacifism aids in population growth. A very passive population can explode and fill every nook and cranny. And then yet one more generation is born, children begin to starve, radicals emerge and things deteriorate EXPLOSIVELY.

This is what got them kicked out of many countries.

Keep in mind that your book describes world conquest. The old testament describes invasion. The new testament describes rebellion. Either way from without or from within, a land is conquered.

You cant have a revolution without martyrs. Jesus is the penultimate example of martyrdom in the course of revolution.
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (34) Jul 27, 2012
Most farmer do have a pitchfork.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.3 / 5 (36) Jul 27, 2012
Most farmer do have a pitchfork.
I was being funny. They grow their own tobacco did you know that? What do godlovers need with drugs??
verkle
2 / 5 (12) Jul 27, 2012
Amish claim to be (and rightly so) descendents of the radical Anabaptist movement of the 15th and 16th centuries. However, their current way of faith and practice and living is a far cry from what their ancestors experienced. Earlier, their ancestors were highly evangelical. Today, trying to be a missionary in the Amish church will likely get you kicked out.

Lurker2358
4.1 / 5 (14) Jul 27, 2012
]Not yet. They are human, and they read the same holy book they did back in 1525, which tells them to martyr themselves as needed. And they have pitchforks.


You're an idiot.

Judaeo Christian Martyrdom means to allow one's self to be killed in the case of personal aggression against one's self, and it is never a requirement.

there is no Biblical commandment of anyone being instructed to martyr themselves through a suicide attack or aggressive behavior, except in the case of David wrongfully ordering Uriah's commander to sacrifice him in a pointless attack, of which the narrative states he and his family was severely punished for this act of murder.

Suicide attacks and personal "rage killings" have no basis in Judaeo-Christian teaching, and they are certainly not considered "Martyrdom".

Martyrdom is when a pacifist believer is wrongfully killed by an aggressor due to said Martyr's religious beliefs. Such as when Stephen was stoned to death due to no violence of his own.
rwinners
5 / 5 (4) Jul 27, 2012
"My guess is that in 15 years, we'll witness a county whose population is majority Amish, and Holmes County is likely to gain that distinction first. Perhaps LaGrange County in Indiana will not be far behind," Donnermeyer said.

It will be interesting to see how the Amish deal with being the majority.... even if it is just within one county. I wonder if I'll live to see it come about.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.4 / 5 (35) Jul 27, 2012
their current way of faith and practice and living is a far cry from what their ancestors experienced. Earlier, their ancestors were highly evangelical. Today, trying to be a missionary in the Amish church will likely get you kicked out.
1) How would YOU know? 2) We have not seen them in a condition where their children are beginning to starve. Yet. As I say when the community is stressed the radicals WILL emerge, as they always do, because various parts describe this mechanism quite well.

It was a radical offshoot which attacked the other Amish and cut their beards off. Their nuts will soon follow.
there is no Biblical commandment of anyone being instructed to martyr themselves through a suicide attack or aggressive behavior
Ha. What do you call it when your head martyr strolls into the holy city on it's holiest day, walks up to the head priests, and claims to be their god? Is this not aggression of the most egregious sort? Was he not demanding to be killed?
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (35) Jul 27, 2012
Martyrdom is when a pacifist believer is wrongfully killed by an aggressor due to said Martyr's religious beliefs. Such as when Stephen was stoned to death due to no violence of his own.
What do you call it when someone demands that he be killed? What do you call it when someone proclaims some idiot belief which he knows will get himself and his family killed?

Inviting violence upon oneself and others, whether you think it pleases god or not, is extremely violent. Any religion which encourages this is just as violent as the one which encourages it's adherents to attack others.

No difference. Luckily all surviving religions have provision for either at the proper time. I would argue that martyrdom is more onerous, the more detestable.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.4 / 5 (34) Jul 27, 2012
Lurker/QC

What would you call it when shiia march en masse to a holy shrine on one of their holy days, knowing full well that Sunni are going to blow some of them up? You would call that stupid. I would call it stupid when xians do essentially the same thing.

Because both are doing it for a god that doesn't exist. Or at least one of them is - but which one? I think it is safe to say both don't you?
rwinners
3.8 / 5 (10) Jul 27, 2012
@Otto Religions will exist long after you and I are dead. You are fighting a loosing battle. I presume you just like to argue.
Vendicar_Decarian
2.1 / 5 (7) Jul 27, 2012
"251,000 Amish in the United States" - Today
"1 million" - 2050

Projection...

4 million by 2088
16 million by 2126
64 million by 2164
256 million by 2202
1 billion by 2240

America is doomed.
rwinners
4 / 5 (4) Jul 27, 2012
LOL! Breeding like bunnies, those Amish!
Vendicar_Decarian
2 / 5 (4) Jul 28, 2012
Those horny, horny, Amish!

http://www.youtub...2WcvlKn0
rwinners
Jul 28, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Deathclock
3.7 / 5 (9) Jul 28, 2012
Here in New York (and also PA to the south) the Amish are vital to the local economy of some small cities and towns where they produce up to 90% of all wooden furniture sold (not counting the particle board trash sold at Walmart and similar giant stores).

Not that I care about them in particular, but due to their simple lifestyle they are basically slaves producing amazing quality woodwork for the rest of us at dirt cheap prices.
Skepticus
1 / 5 (3) Jul 28, 2012
Here in New York (and also PA to the south) the Amish are vital to the local economy of some small cities and towns where they produce up to 90% of all wooden furniture sold (not counting the particle board trash sold at Walmart and similar giant stores).

Not that I care about them in particular, but due to their simple lifestyle they are basically slaves producing amazing quality woodwork for the rest of us at dirt cheap prices.

Well, if they branch into other industries, then we'll have a solution for jobs lost from cheap Chinese imports!
Mastoras
4.5 / 5 (8) Jul 28, 2012
Mr. Ghost_of_Otto seems to have a very special way to strongly misperceive and misrepresent social matters.

It will be advisable if he stop fighting it. Society is not within his reach.
-.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (30) Jul 28, 2012
Mr. Ghost_of_Otto seems to have a very special way to strongly misperceive and misrepresent social matters.

It will be advisable if he stop fighting it. Society is not within his reach.
-.
Blah?
"251,000 Amish in the United States" - Today
"1 million" - 2050

Projection...

4 million by 2088
16 million by 2126
64 million by 2164
256 million by 2202
1 billion by 2240

America is doomed.
'Newsflash - 2082 - hordes of the breakout Amish sect 'Heilige Bundesbartschneidern' attack islamists, hasidim with shears in Lancaster pa, block pa turnpike with oxen...' -Much carnage, furballs
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (34) Jul 28, 2012
@Otto Religions will exist long after you and I are dead. You are fighting a loosing battle. I presume you just like to argue.
Yeah that's what they said about Rome, Russian communism and the NSDAP. Same thing, different timeline. Nothing is eternal. Religion is a caustic meme which feeds on the fallacy that a superbeing that can grant immortality and wishes; nothing more and nothing less.

I am confident that people will grow out of this. In the meantime we have the right and the duty to expose religion for what it is, and to resist it.

They should first be made to pay taxes because at most only one of them can be the correct one, and so until they reach a consensus it should be assumed that they are social clubs. I am sure god will compensate whichever one is his chosen one.
SatanLover
1 / 5 (3) Jul 28, 2012
this is exactly what the american reform committee wants. you can even search for them on youtube and hear them say it in a video. they want to go back to the time of monarchs where the city is prosperous and the lying villages are poor peasants.

i think this is their response to global warming. and i think the UN is part of it as well with their agenda 21.
rwinners
5 / 5 (4) Jul 28, 2012
@Otto Of course they are social clubs! Membership is generally passed along from parents to children. As long as children are allowed to become comfortable in the organizations (ie included as opposed to restricted), religions will continue ad nauseam.
And, of course, if you don't like your religion, you can always start a new one. As you say, the tax status is wonderful!
The function of the social club is quite necessary these days when so few of us actually know our neighbors. Religion's main function is providing a meeting place for people who are, on the surface, like minded.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (27) Jul 28, 2012
this is exactly what the american reform committee wants. you can even search for them on youtube and hear them say it in a video. they want to go back to the time of monarchs where the city is prosperous and the lying villages are poor peasants.

i think this is their response to global warming. and i think the UN is part of it as well with their agenda 21.
The Hasidim will inhabit the inner cities, the islamists the suburbs, and the Amish the farmland. Mormons will be left with desert and dried up lake beds. Oh and Catholic chicanos will have california like they always planned, the reconquista.

This should be an interesting century.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (33) Jul 28, 2012
Religion's main function is providing a meeting place for people who are, on the surface, like minded.
There are better things to base social clubs on than gods who grant wishes in return for hating other clubs. One can do aerobics or join the rotary, both of which are much healthier.

Even a Bund is better than superstition.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.6 / 5 (28) Jul 28, 2012
The mad rush to fill up the earth before the other mensch can have decidedly unhealthy consequences:

"Direct and indirect (mediated by biologic factors) effects of inbreeding on prereproductive mortality (death before age 20 years) were investigated in a case-control study conducted in the Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Old Order Amish..."
http://www.ncbi.n...3812453/

rwinners
4 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2012
"There are better things to base social clubs on than gods who grant wishes in return for hating other clubs. One can do aerobics or join the rotary, both of which are much healthier."

Yes, unfortunately most kids don't get a chance to choose. The inherit their religion just as they do the color of eyes/hair... etc.

I appreciate the Amish because they don't go in for this type of indoctrination. Still, they are a closed community which is more or less typical of religious associations.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (29) Jul 28, 2012
I appreciate the Amish because they don't go in for this type of indoctrination. Still, they are a closed community which is more or less typical of religious associations.
Amish kids are given the choice whether to be baptized or not. They can experience the world and choose to remain or leave. But if they leave they are shunned - a form of coercion.

And most virulent religions are growing by proselytism in addition to propagation; islam and evangelical xianity are 2.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.4 / 5 (31) Jul 28, 2012
PhotonX
5 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2012
Some of these new communities are the result of migration. A woman in Delaware a few years ago told me that at least some Amish are selling high-priced land in, say, Pennsylvania, and then buying low-priced land elsewhere (e.g. Oklahoma).
SatanLover
3 / 5 (2) Jul 28, 2012
Some of these new communities are the result of migration. A woman in Delaware a few years ago told me that at least some Amish are selling high-priced land in, say, Pennsylvania, and then buying low-priced land elsewhere (e.g. Oklahoma).

that doesnt make sense since they wouldnt be new communities, just communities that moved ergo they may count a new place as a new community but the old place gets deleted from the statistics.
Doug_Huffman
3.9 / 5 (8) Jul 29, 2012
Using a lottery to select leaders and avoid elites and corruption has roots in Ancient Greece and Sortition (the Pinakion and Kleroterion). In contemporary American culture, we know it as VoterID. Perhaps the Old Way should be new again.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.8 / 5 (25) Jul 29, 2012
Some of these new communities are the result of migration. A woman in Delaware a few years ago told me that at least some Amish are selling high-priced land in, say, Pennsylvania, and then buying low-priced land elsewhere (e.g. Oklahoma).

that doesnt make sense since they wouldnt be new communities, just communities that moved ergo they may count a new place as a new community but the old place gets deleted from the statistics.
That is something they no doubt considered dont you think? Farms in PA have been divided to the max. Lancaster county is within commuting distance of phila and is one of the fastest-growing in PA. Amish are under pressure to sell.

Their buggies are tearing up the roads and their farms are polluting streams - this is a form of persecution. They are being accused of child abuse among other things.

Many have had to get other work - construction, retail, tourism. Quilts and furniture are big business.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.6 / 5 (27) Jul 29, 2012
It is hard to grasp the ramifications of pops which are doubling every 20 years. In the middle east and Africa this alone explains all the violence and suffering. In gaza, 60% of the pop is still in grade school. 'Fear the next generation' is what they warn Israelis. In surrounding countries we see the results of similar growth. In Palestine this makes war Inevitable as well.

Tobacco is not the only amish drug of interest
http://articles.p...ty-amish

-I found at least 3 different instances. Hey - amish are human too.
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (31) Jul 29, 2012
"Their buggies are tearing up the roads and their farms are polluting streams - this is a form of persecution." Otto

Can you be more stupid? Please?
ryggesogn2
3.2 / 5 (18) Jul 29, 2012
This is what the anti-religionists fear and why they must resort to using state power to attack religion.
Muslims, Mormon, Amish, and Catholics support large families and most of their children follow in their parents religion.
If the anti-religionists truly supported the US first amendment they should have no worries.
Now when the Muslims and Mormons win their court case allowing them more than one wife, their numbers will really explode.
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (32) Jul 29, 2012
"Now when the Muslims and Mormons win their court case allowing them more than one wife, their numbers will really explode." - Ryg

Which particular court case is this?
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.8 / 5 (24) Jul 29, 2012
"Their buggies are tearing up the roads and their farms are polluting streams - this is a form of persecution." Otto

Can you be more stupid? Please?

Damage to roads caused by buggy wheels and horseshoes has been a major source of contention:
http://enquirer.c...oes.html

-As is manure and fertilizer runoff
http://lancastero...ion.html

-Politicians in the sway of real estate interests HAVE been using these and other issues to harass amish who occupy very valuable land.

I expect an apology.
ryggesogn2
3.4 / 5 (17) Jul 29, 2012
"Now when the Muslims and Mormons win their court case allowing them more than one wife, their numbers will really explode." - Ryg

Which particular court case is this?

Wait for it.
If homosexuals can use the courts to force a change in the definition of marriage based upon 'civil' rights, Mormons and Muslims have a better case based upon the first amendment.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.6 / 5 (23) Jul 29, 2012
This is what the anti-religionists fear and why they must resort to using state power to attack religion.
I haven't used any state power here have I? I suppose you could count publicly-funded research projects which have dissected your book and combed the holy land and have declared fraud. Better than the religionists who have done the sane things and lied about what they found eh? You can't trust private interests.

"'A spade in one hand and a bible in the other' never worked." -finkelstein
ryggesogn2
3.9 / 5 (15) Jul 29, 2012
No need to wait:

"Making polygamous unions illegal, they argue, violates the due process and equal protection clauses of the 14th Amendment, as well as the free exercise, establishment, free speech and freedom of association clauses of the First Amendment. "
http://www.nytime...amy.html
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.7 / 5 (26) Jul 29, 2012
Muslims, Mormon, Amish, and Catholics support large families and most of their children follow in their parents religion.
If the anti-religionists truly supported the US first amendment they should have no worries.
Ah this would only cause you fundys to untape your old testaments and declare holy war. You have some catching up to do you know. You better reconsider that age of consent thing. Adolescents weren't always children you know.

"Today I am a man." -used to mean something. 'Children of our youth' and all. It's there if and when you need it. And you ALWAYS do seem to need it, sooner or later.
No need to wait:
I suppose it impinges on a mans property rights as well.
Deathclock
2.9 / 5 (8) Jul 30, 2012
"Their buggies are tearing up the roads and their farms are polluting streams - this is a form of persecution." Otto

Can you be more stupid? Please?


No it's true, I live around Amish and see their buggies regularly, and my uncle is the highway superintendent in the city that I was raised. Roads are not built for horses or thin metal wheels. Most of it is of course due to freeze/thaw cycles during the winter which causes cracks to be wedged apart further, but Amish horses and buggies are a primary cause of those cracks.
Estevan57
2.4 / 5 (32) Jul 31, 2012
"The lawsuit is not demanding that states recognize polygamous marriage." From the link to The Times.

"I expect an apology." -Otto
Bite me bitch.
Estevan57
2.4 / 5 (34) Jul 31, 2012
Thanks for the info, Deathclock.
Mastoras
5 / 5 (2) Jul 31, 2012
Using a lottery to select leaders...

It is also mentioned as the way ancient Greeks distributed the land when founding a new colony.

Also, it is mentioned in the Old Testament, as the way that the Hebrews (Jews) distributed among them the land that they conquered.

Now, if you think the only interesting thing in this world is physics and astronomy..., you are just missing all the fun!!
-.
Mastoras
5 / 5 (2) Jul 31, 2012
Politicians in the sway of real estate interests HAVE been using these and other issues to harass amish who occupy very valuable land.


Well, now, I am really impressed!!

Sometimes, Otto is able to think into somebody's head and read correctly among the lines of a situation, even if that means setting aside his usual one-color blindness.
-.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.7 / 5 (24) Jul 31, 2012
Politicians in the sway of real estate interests HAVE been using these and other issues to harass amish who occupy very valuable land.


Well, now, I am really impressed!!

Sometimes, Otto is able to think into somebody's head and read correctly among the lines of a situation, even if that means setting aside his usual one-color blindness.
-.
Naw I just read this somewhere. Pretty obvious though; and fully expected. Typical religionist passive-aggression. Annoys the hell out of people, and for good reason. That is its Purpose. Thats why hasidim wear those funny costumes and islamist women wear niqabs.

What color might you be referring to?
http://www.youtub...=related
"The lawsuit is not demanding that states recognize polygamous marriage." From the link to The Times. "I expect an apology." -Otto Bite me bitch.
And I just said somewhere that it takes a big man to admit it when he is wrong. Eh peewee?
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (31) Jul 31, 2012
"Well, now, I am really impressed!!

Sometimes, Otto is able to think into somebody's head and read correctly among the lines of a situation, even if that means setting aside his usual one-color blindness." - Mastoras

Quite the polite way of say congratulations Oddo, you finally understood something.

What I consider stupid is stating that buggy rut damage and cow poop is "persecution". I have no problem with the fact that it occurs.

So, asshat, ya gonna chase me around this site and downrate me with lite, Ghostofottofartsonya and others? Go for it little man.
Little is as little does.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.6 / 5 (25) Jul 31, 2012
What I consider stupid is stating that buggy rut damage and cow poop is "persecution".
You must have misread the post because well youre foreign. Too bad.
I have no problem with the fact that it occurs.
And like I said these issues are being used by unscrupulous landgrabbing developers to persecute the poor amish tobacco addicts by raising their taxes and regulating them out of the county.

Here is one for other lamos for dont know how to check facts with google:
http://abcnews.go...p;page=1
So, asshat, ya gonna chase me around this site and downrate me with lite, Ghostofottofartsonya and others? Go for it little man.
Little is as little does.
Like I said dweeb that is not me, if you check my ratings you will see the same pussypuppet is downrating me as well.

So now you owe me 2 apologies and also one for calling me a cunt. Thats 3. Drei. Tres. Trois. III.
Bewia
not rated yet Jul 31, 2012
Life style of Amishes provides unique way for testing of various civilization impacts including the health care provided with Big Pharma companies. For example Amishes are known with their dismissal of vaccination - but they're way more healthier and the frequency of autism and sudden infant death syndrome in their population is two orders lower, than the USA average. They don't suffer with obesity, heart diseases or diabetes. Even frequency of cancer between Amishes is about 72% lower, than the USA average.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (31) Jul 31, 2012
Life style of Amishes provides unique way for testing of various civilization impacts including the health care provided with Big Pharma companies. For example Amishes are known with their dismissal of vaccination
And even jigga/zephyr/alizee/terrivax20 is too lazy to check google.
http://blogs.plos...d-study/

-The amish partake of gods gift of medicine the same as everybody else. What you think they are nuts like xian scientists? (of course they are)

They even drive toyotas but they are black.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.5 / 5 (31) Jul 31, 2012
They don't suffer with obesity, heart diseases or diabetes
Here are some overweight amish
http://ivarfjeld....lem1.jpg
"Question: What is the average life expectancy of Amish men and women and what is the number one cause of death in the Amish communities?

Answer: It is the same as for all persons in the United States, no different than for other groups of people. Answer coordinated by THE BUDGET [Editor: According to US Government Statistics, the average life expectancy for Caucasian men is 74.3 and for Caucasian women is 79.9. The leading cause of death is heart disease."
http://www.amish.net/faq.asp
Bewia
not rated yet Jul 31, 2012
Here are some overweight amish
Here are some underweighted Americans. Does it prove something? Or what did you want to say with it? BTW Your article is full of nonsenses, if not apparent lies. For example it states that "Amishes don't just wear white and/or black. Ladies wear shades of blue, green, red, brown, etc.." But just your photo pictures some Amishes in black suits. So what is should think about such a source?
Bewia
5 / 5 (1) Jul 31, 2012
Actually, your picture illustrates some Jews, not Amishes. Where/how did you found it?
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.8 / 5 (24) Jul 31, 2012
Actually, your picture illustrates some Jews, not Amishes. Where/how did you found it?
On the INTERNET. Pretty funny yesnoyes?? But they appear similar for very good Reasons.
Bewia
not rated yet Jul 31, 2012
Well, Jews historically avoided the manual work, the work in agriculture the more, whereas Amishes avoid the pilling of money. The other aspects of both communities may appear more similar, but they just don't affect the fatness and healthy life style. So it's not so strange, you can find slim Amish more easily, than some Jew. Sometimes the dolphin is simply not a shark under all circumstances - despite they may appear similar in many other aspects.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.7 / 5 (26) Aug 01, 2012
Per the myth, Jews are traditionally herders. Abel was a herder and his brother Cain was a farmer. Their conflict reflects an age-old one over land use. As pops swell and land becomes scarce, this is one source of contention which always emerges. We saw the potential for extreme violence most recently in the Hutu/Tutsi wars in Burundi and Rwanda, where millions died.

But hasidim/orthodox and Amish are both examples of radical religionists. They wear funny costumes to further alienate themselves from others. Same with Sikhs, hari krishnas, islamists, etc. Derision helps to isolate the community (tribe) and strengthen it's solidarity.

The Intention is to have people making fun of them and harassing them. It is part of the Formula for the success of the surviving religions today.
Estevan57
2.4 / 5 (29) Aug 01, 2012
Wow Otto, that is some of the most idiotic crap ever posted. Keep up the good work. Religious people wear different clothes to be ostracized? Really? Buh Doh. Bad, even for you, ya foreigner.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.8 / 5 (25) Aug 02, 2012
that is some of the most idiotic crap ever posted. Keep up the good work. Religious people wear different clothes to be ostracized? Really? Buh Doh. Bad, even for you, ya foreigner.
I suppose you think they wear their uniforms because god wants them to eh? Religion is the extension of the tribal dynamic over large and disparate populations.

Their uniforms help to make them stand out and to separate them from unbelievers. Ostracism only assists in this separation while solidifying internal cohesion and compelling them to grow their numbers, by proselytism and propagation. And by conquest. The sillier they look the better.

This is not limited to religions. Young people will develop outlandish styles to distinguish their groups and gangs. Primitive tribes will wear different paint and accessories. Sports team fans wear the same colors. The people who concocted the successful religions understood this very well.

This is pretty obvious after only a little reflection. Yes?
Deathclock
3.4 / 5 (5) Aug 02, 2012
At least the Amish aren't blatant hypocrites like most Christians... my mother and stepfather are the craziest bunch of YEC creationists you'll ever meet and they take the bible literally... when it says what they already agree with, otherwise they ignore it. They live in a giant house that they purchased at rock bottom prices when the bank foreclosed on the previous owners, they have tens of thousands of dollars of electronics in their den, they have a giant pool table and other expensive shit in the game room, etc etc etc... but Jesus said it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven... Jesus would have them sell all that shit and give the proceeds to the needy and live in poverty concerning themselves only with doing good for others etc etc... hypocrites, which the Amish are not.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2.8 / 5 (24) Aug 03, 2012
Amish even have conventions in new joisey
http://www.youtub...embedded