Health impact from smoke rises with more intense wildfires

Climate change in the Western U.S. means more intense and frequent wildfires churning out waves of smoke that scientists say will sweep across the continent to affect tens of millions of people and cause a spike in premature ...

How the urban-rural divide shapes elections

Location, location, location—the popular real estate mantra can also be used to describe why American elections today turn out the way they do, says Stanford political scientist Jonathan Rodden. According to his new research, ...

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Rural area

Rural areas ( referred to as "the countryside") are large and isolated areas of a country, often with low population density. Today, 75 percent of the United States' inhabitants live in suburban and urban areas, but cities occupy only 2 percent of the country. Rural areas occupy the remaining 98 percent.

About 91 percent of the rural population now earn salaried incomes, often in urban areas. The 10 percent who still produce resources generate 20 percent of the world’s coal, copper, and oil; 10 percent of its wheat, 20 percent of its meat, and 50 percent of its corn. The efficiency of these farms is due in large part to the commercialization of the farming industry, and not single family operations.

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