New satellite movie chases post-Tropical Storm Alberto in Atlantic

May 23, 2012

On May 23, 2012, the remnants of post-tropical storm Alberto were chasing a frontal system over the Atlantic Ocean, several hundred miles east of the U.S. East coast. A new NASA animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite shows the progression of Alberto's remnants.

The last advisory on Alberto from the National Hurricane Center was posted on May 22, at 11 a.m. EDT. At that time, Alberto was a post-tropical storm with near 35 mph (55 kph). It was centered about 295 miles (470 km) south-southeast of Norfolk, Virginia near 33.1 North and 74.0 West and moving quickly to the northeast at 17 mph (28 kph).

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This movie was created using GOES-15 satellite imagery gathered from May 21-23 at 1745 UTC (1:45 p.m. EDT). In the animation, Alberto is first seen off the coast of South Carolina. As the animation progresses, the storm moves northeast toward a large cold front off the coast of the eastern US. By May 22 around 1845 UTC, Alberto's remnants appear to begin interacting with the frontal system as both push northeast. By May 23 at 1731 UTC (1:31 p.m. EDT), the weak remaining circulation associated with Alberto is still slightly west of the frontal system. Credit: Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

This movie was created using GOES-15 gathered from May 21 to May 23 at 1745 UTC (1:45 p.m. EDT). In the animation, Alberto is first seen off the coast of South Carolina. As the animation progresses, the storm moves northeast toward a large cold front off the coast of the eastern U.S. By May 22 around 1845 UTC, Alberto's remnants appear to begin interacting with the frontal system as both push northeast. By May 23 at 1731 UTC (1:31 p.m. EDT), the weak remaining circulation associated with Alberto is still slightly west of the frontal system. The National Hurricane Center noted that Alberto's remnants are expected to dissipate by sometime on May 25.

GOES-15 is operated by the . The animation was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

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