Climate scientists say they have solved riddle of rising sea

May 20, 2012
Massive extraction of groundwater can resolve a puzzle over a rise in sea levels in past decades, scientists in Japan said on Sunday. Global sea levels rose by an average of 1.8 millimetres (0.07 inches) per year from 1961-2003, according to data from tide gauges.

Massive extraction of groundwater can resolve a puzzle over a rise in sea levels in past decades, scientists in Japan said on Sunday.

Global sea levels rose by an average of 1.8 millimetres (0.07 inches) per year from 1961-2003, according to data from tide gauges.

But the big question is how much of this can be pinned to global warming.

In its landmark 2007 report, the UN's Nobel-winning (IPCC) ascribed 1.1mm (0.04 inches) per year to of the oceans -- water expands when it is heated -- and to meltwater from , icecaps and the Greenland and Antarctica icecaps.

That left 0.7mm (0.03 inches) per year unaccounted for, a mystery that left many scientists wondering if the data were correct or if there were some source that had eluded everyone.

In a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, a team led by Yadu Pokhrel of the University of Tokyo say the answer lies in water that is extracted from underground aquifers, rivers and lakes for human development but is never replenished.

The water eventually makes it to the ocean through rivers and evaporation in the soil, they note.

Groundwater extraction is the main component of additions that account for the mystery gap, according to their paper, which is based on computer modelling.

"Together, unsustainable groundwater use, artificial reservoir water impoundment, climate-driven change in terrestrial and the loss of water from closed basins have contributed a rise of 0.77mm (0.031 inches) per year between 1961 and 2003, about 42 percent of the observed sea-level rise," it says.

The probe seeks to fill one of the in the complex science of climate change.

Researchers admit to many unknowns about how the oceans respond to warming, and one of them is sea-level rise, an important question for hundreds of millions of coastal dwellers.

Just a tiny rise, if repeated year on year, can eventually have a dramatic impact in locations that are vulnerable to storm surges or the influx of saltwater into aquifers or coastal fields.

In its 2007 Fourth Assessment Report, the IPCC said the oceans would rise by between 18 and 59 centimetres (seven to 23 inches) by the century's end.

But this estimate did not factor in from the mighty Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

A study published last year by the Oslo-based Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Project (AMAP) said sea levels would rise, on current melting trends, by 90 cms to 1.6 metres (3.0 to 5.3 feet) by 2100.

Explore further: Study links polar vortex chills to melting sea ice

More information: DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1476

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omatwankr
2.3 / 5 (27) May 20, 2012
"Yadu Pokhrel of the University of Tokyo say the answer lies"

They even admit it, their own answers LIE, the blatant gall, and no I am not taking things out of context, they are taunting me!... or so the voices that haunt me keep saying.
Caliban
2.8 / 5 (20) May 20, 2012
@omatwankr

Since you are publicly declaring your schizoid delusions, I recommend that you seek professional help.

A lay diagnoses is that the cognitive dissonance created by your denial of reality in the face of consistent scientific support of observed fact has created a chronic psycopathic condition.

In other words, as your above comment illustrates, your self-delusion has resulted in (quite possibly permanent)brain damage.

slack
4.4 / 5 (19) May 20, 2012
?? Caliban ??
The guy's making a joke?
Wake up mate...
NotParker
2.1 / 5 (32) May 20, 2012
"42 percent of the observed sea-level rise" has nothing to do with so-called global warming.

That was very, very brave of them to put in print.
tachyphylaxis
2.7 / 5 (7) May 20, 2012
Clearly, self-deception cannot be the result of a properly functioning brain and is always a manifestation of neurophysiological pathology, i.e. "brain damage". That must be why, then, lay "diagnosis" of "mental illness" is so popular as an ad hominem attack.

Wait, are we supposed to be talking about science?
indio007
2.5 / 5 (11) May 20, 2012
What I don't under stand is how human beings keeping water from reaching the ocean made the sea level rise.
Oysteroid
3.1 / 5 (14) May 20, 2012
Humans are like that Indio. We even manage to make winters colder by the crafty use of the AGW.
Cave_Man
2.7 / 5 (12) May 20, 2012
What I don't under stand is how human beings keeping water from reaching the ocean made the sea level rise.


Because we are keeping more and more out of the underground aquifers and the primary means of water loss from human uses is evaporation therefore the water is more likely to end up in the oceans.

I don't know.

What I do know is that we are changing the planet in dramatic ways that we probably don't understand yet.

On the topic of brain damage, if you have ever been in gridlock traffic for any amount of time in a big city with 5 lanes of suvs semis and large trucks...well....think about it, if you still can.

At least carbon monoxide causes a specific type of brain damage, anyone else out there can't get songs or melodies or words out of their head a lot these days? Seems like every time my mind tries to relax it goes for some sound pattern.
rwinners
3.1 / 5 (8) May 20, 2012
It's not so much the sea level rise that concerns me. It is that, coupled with the increased atmospheric energy it implies that I think is going to provide a double whammy to coastal humanity.
Caliban
3.6 / 5 (5) May 20, 2012
?? Caliban ??
The guy's making a joke?
Wake up mate...


@slack,

Are you certain of that? If that is the case, then of course I apologize for my sarcastic ridicule.

But to make that determination, we'll have to go straight to the source--

@omatwankr,

Care to elaborate?

Mastoras
4.2 / 5 (5) May 20, 2012
"42 percent of the observed sea-level rise" has nothing to do with so-called global warming.


No. They said this rise comes from extracting too much ground water for so many decades. But the conditions that enabled this are obviously the industrial society, that produced the powerful pumps and made the extaction of this water necessary. Now, industrial society is obviously a man-made factor.
-.
Ness
1.1 / 5 (12) May 20, 2012
I don't think the quantity of groundwater is enough to cause the 0.031 inch annual rise of sea level. How about the sun, as well as the vast space itself? I think they also play the role in the rise the sea level.
Caliban
4.1 / 5 (9) May 20, 2012
"42 percent of the observed sea-level rise" has nothing to do with so-called global warming.

That was very, very brave of them to put in print.


NP,

From the article:


" "Together, unsustainable groundwater use, artificial reservoir water impoundment, [climate-driven change in terrestrial water storage] and the loss of water from closed basins have contributed a sea-level rise of 0.77mm (0.031 inches) per year between 1961 and 2003, about 42 percent of the observed sea-level rise," it says. "

Please note the bracketed segment of the quote from the article.

You interpret too broadly at best, or maybe deliberately ignore what is clearly stated in the article.

Which is it?

julianpenrod
1.6 / 5 (13) May 21, 2012
So often, there are crucial facets of a story that go utterly unnoticed. omatwankr began the comments by deliberately misquoting the statement that the answer to the change in sea levels lies in water extracted from undergound aquifers to just "the answer lies". Crude and insipid, unavailing, the action of a vicious blowhard who talks only to hear themselves talk and will willingly mutilate any statement into something it is not, just to bludgeon others and pretend they are right.
And for this butchery of everything "science" supposedly stands for, omatwankr got 12 people to approve!
That can genuinely question just what PhysOrg thinks it's around for, to promote truth or just breed liars and wastrels who admire those liars.
Vendicar_Decarian
3.4 / 5 (23) May 21, 2012
But that is what Libertarian/Randite Wankers do 24/7.

It is the only way they can excuse their queen - Ayn Rand - for going on the public dole rather than pay for her own medical care when she developed lung cancer after decades of her 3 pack a day habit that she denied was associated with cancer.

Her argument that the link between Cancer and smoking was s scam by the medical community to extort money from the American people, and that the science behind the link was a colossal fraud perpetrated by evil government scientists trying to impose socialism on the American people.

"So often, there are crucial facets of a story that go utterly unnoticed. omatwankr began the comments by deliberately misquoting the statement" - Julianpenrod
NotParker
1.8 / 5 (25) May 21, 2012
[climate-driven change in terrestrial water storage]

Please note the bracketed segment of the quote from the article.


Doesn't mention humans. Of course climate affects water supplies. There are long cycles where droughts come and go, and they have exists for thousands of years.

" In the period between A.D. 1125 and 1180, very little rain fell in the region. After 1180, rainfall briefly returned to normal. From 1270 to 1274 there was another long drought, followed by another period of normal rainfall. In 1275, yet another drought began. This one lasted 14 years.

When this cycle of drought began, Anasazi civilization was at its height. Communities were densely populated. Even with good rains, the Anasazi were using their land to its limits. Without rain, it was impossible to grow enough food to support the population. Widespread famine occurred."

http://www.learne...yon.html
NotParker
1.6 / 5 (20) May 21, 2012
"42 percent of the observed sea-level rise" has nothing to do with so-called global warming.


No. They said this rise comes from extracting too much ground water for so many decades. But the conditions that enabled this are obviously the industrial society, that produced the powerful pumps and made the extaction of this water necessary. Now, industrial society is obviously a man-made factor.
-.


Agriculture in regions without enough rain need water. The aquifers are being drained to grow food ... and corn to burn in cars.
A2G
2.3 / 5 (15) May 21, 2012
Holy s**t, The first comment was a total mocking of someone who does not seem to raise his head anymore for fear of retaliation, or he has finally come to his senses, or he has been arrested mostly due to his revealing that neutron repulsion is the real reason for global warming.

If you did not get this then sorry. You got played.

Omawhatever is a slap against a guy who disappeared from here for whatever reason.

As a very wise man once said. Can't we all just get along?

Let's just take each story on global warming from either side with just a pinch of salt and two shots of vodka. Then just maybe we can all cut through the clutter and arrive at the real truth.

That being that all of us might be friends if not for the screens (pc or mac, but that is another war) that separate us.

As for me. I wish you all a good week end and that Monday will find you happier than today.

Peace, and back to the vodka and legal cannabis.

Sorry if I offended anyone.
.
A2G
3 / 5 (18) May 21, 2012
Vendicar

You have a lot of s**t that you say that I would agree with. You just need to stop attacking people the way you do. You are intelligent enough to rise above this level of attack.

That is the main thing that bothers me about how you handle what you say. Think before you write. You are smarter than that.
Feldagast
3.3 / 5 (4) May 21, 2012
Your citing Rodney King as a very wise man?
A2G
1.4 / 5 (9) May 21, 2012
"Your citing Rodney King as a very wise man?"

Yes, that is correct, with tongue firmly in cheek.

How many shots for you, my friend?
mrtea
2.1 / 5 (8) May 21, 2012
A2G - I agree with you. I have complained about Vendicar's bad manners before and also reported him. I suggest you report him if you are offended. Thanks.
Husky
2.3 / 5 (4) May 21, 2012
a fortune with misfortune is that the "unsustainable aquafiers" will run out anyway, so they stop bothering us with sealevel risings...
StarGazer2011
1.9 / 5 (10) May 21, 2012
meh, some guys plug a hole in a computer model with another computer model; wake me when the science starts.
kevinrtrs
1.9 / 5 (13) May 21, 2012
@Cave_man:
At least carbon monoxide causes a specific type of brain damage, anyone else out there can't get songs or melodies or words out of their head a lot these days? Seems like every time my mind tries to relax it goes for some sound pattern.

Lack of sleep is the most common cause of unwanted songs in the head. Getting at least 8 hours of quality sleep every day for a week fixes it real fast.

As for global warming - who knows. There's such a lot of hot gas being exhausted by billions of people.....
UleeUggams
1.8 / 5 (4) May 21, 2012
I Believe the theory is plausable but their are many factors, now figure in the tonnage of space dust and debris that falls daily through the atmosphere and what is the effect on the oceans
Vendicar_Decarian
3.4 / 5 (17) May 21, 2012
The unsustainable removal of water from an aquifer for agriculture makes the agriculture unsustainable.

"Agriculture in regions without enough rain need water." - ParkerTard

ParkerTard's mental disease makes causes him to insist that the unsustainable must be sustainable because his ConservaTard political ideology requires it.
Vendicar_Decarian
3.8 / 5 (13) May 21, 2012
Attack is the proper word. Vengeance is the proper motivation. Time is drawing near.

"You have a lot of s**t that you say that I would agree with. You just need to stop attacking people the way you do. You are intelligent enough to rise above this level of attack." - A2G
thermodynamics
5 / 5 (7) May 21, 2012
Give omatwankr a break. He is making a play on words of our old neutron repulsion, child molesting, idiot-in-waiting Omator. Calling him a Wanker should give it away.
NotParker
1.8 / 5 (19) May 21, 2012
The unsustainable removal of water from an aquifer for agriculture makes the agriculture unsustainable.

"Agriculture in regions without enough rain need water." - ParkerTard



Then why is your side using that water to grow crops to burn in cars?

Egleton
2 / 5 (4) May 27, 2012
Garbage. It were the tide wot dun it. (Feeble attempt at joke)

I am impressed with their resolution. mm of rise, no less. How did they get it so accurate?
Vendicar_Decarian
3.7 / 5 (3) May 28, 2012
It would appear that Capitalists believe that cars must be fed before people are.

"Then why is your side using that water to grow crops to burn in cars?" - ParkerTard

Poor FonCused BoyTard.