Russia launches cargo ship

Apr 20, 2012
Progress will deliver fuel, food and water to the International Space Station
A Russian Soyuz-U booster carrying the cargo spacecraft Progress atop rises on a launch pad at the Russian leased Kazakhstan's Baikonur cosmodrome on April 18. The Russian cargo ship Progress M-15M was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and successfully put into orbit.

The Russian cargo ship Progress M-15M was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and successfully put into orbit on Friday, the mission control centre said.

Progress that aims to deliver fuel, food and water to the was launched at 4:50 pm (1250 GMT) Friday and was put into shortly afterward, a representative of the Russian mission control told AFP.

It is due to dock with the ISS on Sunday at 6:40 pm (1440 GMT).

The ISS, which orbits 350 kilometres (about 220 miles) above the earth, is permanently occupied by international researchers.

The Russian space industry suffered a spate of failed launches in 2011.

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User comments : 8

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Vendicar_Decarian
0.6 / 5 (41) Apr 20, 2012
Thank God the Russians are there to pick up the pieces after America's failure at being a space fairing nation.
baudrunner
1 / 5 (2) Apr 20, 2012
What a ridiculous thing to say. The number of space launches that have been made by U.S. interests since the shuttle was retired would boggle your mind. In fact, launches are being done routinely from the middle of the Pacific.
Terriva
1 / 5 (1) Apr 20, 2012
The evolution of Russian space-flight technology did freeze in the mid of 70's. It's enough to unmanaged jumps into orbit, but can Russians handle something bigger? I doubt it - even the Chinese appear better prepared for it by now.
Sonhouse
not rated yet Apr 20, 2012
The evolution of Russian space-flight technology did freeze in the mid of 70's. It's enough to unmanaged jumps into orbit, but can Russians handle something bigger? I doubt it - even the Chinese appear better prepared for it by now.
Now if we can only do the same. As a former Apollo worker, it is sad to see us flounder like this. It goes back as far as Nixon and Carter. Nixon, I'm sure, said something like this to himself: "I'm dam well not going to let a Democrat led program go on now that we proved the point, we beat the Ruskies" And Carter should have canceled the Shuttle instead of the space station they had then, used throwaway rockets, it would have been cheaper as it turned out. We wasted a lot of money, time, and engineering talent on the Shuttle which we now know for certain was a boondoggle.
Sonhouse
not rated yet Apr 20, 2012
I remember some assshole saying how the shuttle would make spaceflight SO cheap, 100 dollars a pound to get into orbit. Well we all know how THAT turned out.
Terriva
not rated yet Apr 20, 2012
It worked so, until the price of oil and kerosene was low and the price of electronics was high. It made a good sense to make spaceship reusable, after then. Now the ratio of these numbers just inverted. http://www.thespa...e/1881/1
Vendicar_Decarian
0.3 / 5 (36) Apr 20, 2012
That was how the shuttle was sold, and on it's ability to precisely place and remove satellites from geosynchronous orbit.

"I remember some assshole saying how the shuttle would make spaceflight SO cheap, 100 dollars a pound to get into orbit." - Sonhouse

And then came the Republican budget cuts that took the original Shuttle program and turned it into a stripped down military vehicle designed for launching military spy satellites.

Then as soon as it was built and the military knew the launch price, they dropped their shuttle program.

Thanx to Republican traitors, shuttles that were produced were always military vehicles looking for civilian work.
baudrunner
not rated yet Apr 21, 2012
The following was lifted from http://www.spacel...011.html

Space launches in 2011:

Vehicle Overall
Launches
(Failures)

CZ 19(1)
R-7 19(2)
Proton 9(1)
Ariane 5 5(0)
Atlas 5 5(0)
Zenit 5(0)
Space Shuttle 3(0)
PSLV 3(0)
Delta 4 3(0)
Delta 2 3(0)
H-2A 2(0)
Minotaur 1 2(0)
H-2B 1(0)
Dnepr 1(0)
Minotaur 4 1(0)
Safir 1(0)
Rokot/Briz KM 1(1)
Taurus XL 1(1)

Total 84(6)

I guess there are more than the report says, if I'm right. I might have been misled ;|

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