Kim Dotcom allowed back online in New Zealand

Apr 02, 2012

(AP) -- The founder of file-sharing website Megaupload, Kim Dotcom, is being allowed back online.

Dotcom was previously denied Internet access under bail conditions imposed by New Zealand authorities after his January arrest. He remains under .

U.S. prosecutors seeking to extradite accuse him of racketeering by facilitating millions of illegal downloads of copyrighted material on his website.

New Zealand Judge David Harvey on Monday said Dotcom's behavior since his arrest appears to have been "exemplary."

The judge ruled Dotcom could access the Internet, go swimming once a day, travel twice a week to an Auckland studio to record music, and meet once a week with his co-accused Megaupload colleagues ahead of an August hearing.

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User comments : 2

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Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (4) Apr 02, 2012
Free dotcom.

He is a political prisoner.
OverweightAmerican
3.7 / 5 (3) Apr 02, 2012
Agree. Free him - he is no threat to society, in fact quite the opposite.

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