EU agrees crack down on shark finning

Mar 19, 2012
British performance artist Alice Newstead protests against shark finning in the window of a London shop. The European Union endorsed tighter shark fishing rules on Monday to ensure fishermen respect a ban on slicing off the fins of their catches and throwing the live body overboard to drown. The European Union endorsed tighter shark fishing rules on Monday.

The European Union endorsed tighter shark fishing rules on Monday to ensure fishermen respect a ban on slicing off the fins of their catches and throwing the live body overboard to drown.

The EU has prohibited shark finning since 2003, but an exemption allows with special permits to remove the fins from their carcass out at sea and bring back the remainders together or land them in different ports.

EU fisheries ministers meeting in Brussels endorsed a European Commission proposal that would force fishermen to bring to port intact. The must now take up the proposal.

While shark finning is forbidden in EU waters and vessels, the ministers said in a statement, "the still possible processing on board has cast doubts about the effectiveness of controls."

Asia's taste for is viewed as a key threat to sharks, with marine protection groups saying up to 73 million are killed annually to satisfy demand for the delicacy.

EU nations combined account for the second-largest share, with 14 percent of the world's catches.

Slow to grow and with very few young per birth, sharks are exceptionally vulnerable with several dozen species threatened with extinction.

"In recent years, some have been severely targeted and put under serious threat as a result of a dramatic increase in demand for shark products, fins in particular," the EU ministers said.

Shark finning has also increased due to a strong demand for traditional medical cures in Asia, the ministers added.

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User comments : 1

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Jonseer
1 / 5 (1) Mar 19, 2012
Few things strike me as odd as shark fin soup, except perhaps edible bird's nests made of bird saliva.

To take only the TOP shark fin, which is just another part of the shark is mind boggling.

How in the world is this fin superior or possessing of qualities that make it so choice is a mystery (beyond that based on faith which doesn't require facts).

Just as unjustifiable is the fact many fishermen then throw the entire shark back in the ocean to die after cutting off that ONE SINGLE TOP FIN????

They could at least take the whole thing to market and sell the flesh.

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