New exhibition, website guide visitors through the evolving universe

Nov 30, 2011
Most stars form close together in nebulae - large cosmic clouds of gas and dust that act as stellar nurseries. The nebula IC 410 is located 13,000 light-years from Earth and spans 15 light-years. This visible-light photograph was taken with the Megacam instrument on the MMT telescope atop Mount Hopkins, Arizona. Credit: Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

The cosmos constantly changes. Stars are born, live out their lives, and die - sometimes calmly, sometimes explosively. Galaxies form, grow, and collide dramatically. A new exhibition and website, developed jointly by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, reveal the dynamic and evolving universe through breathtaking photographs and informative captions.

"The Evolving Universe" explores how the stars, galaxies and universe undergo the same stages as : from birth, to maturity and, eventually, to death. This remarkable journey from present-day Earth to the far reaches of space and time will be on view in the in Washington, D.C., through July 7, 2013.

A worldwide audience also can experience the through its website, located at http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/evolving-universe . All of the images featured in the museum gallery can be downloaded in high-resolution jpegs or PDFs formatted in poster size.

"Anyone can select their favorite space photo, download it, and take it to their local copy shop to print it," said Smithsonian Jonathan McDowell, who played a lead role in developing the exhibition.

Visitors to the exhibition or website can choose one of two paths to explore the cosmos. They can begin close to home with our solar system and move outward to the farthest reaches of the universe. Or they can begin 13.7 billion years ago at the moment of the Big Bang and move forward in time to the present day. Along their journey they will learn how a variety of telescopes and instruments, many developed by SAO, reveal the fascinating history of the expanding universe.

"We've all seen the amazing pictures from NASA's probes in our own solar system," said McDowell. "I'm excited about bringing to the public the remarkable images of the broader universe that we astronomers have been exploring with our telescopes. I hope that with this exhibition visitors will take away an appreciation for our larger cosmic neighborhood."

"The Evolving Universe" is located on the second floor of the , between the Minerals Store and the Korea Gallery. For more information about the museum, visit it at http://www.mnh.si.edu .

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User comments : 3

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omatumr
1.1 / 5 (9) Nov 30, 2011
the evolving universe


Is either powered by:

a.) Fusion of light elements like Hydrogen into heavier ones and then into compact, neutron-rich objects, and perhaps into black holes - - - as the Big Bang Model of the universe predicts, OR

b.) Fragmentation of massive, compact neutron-rich objects into galaxies of stars that continue to emit neutrons because of neutron repulsion [1] and generate the Hydrogen that fills interstellar space and causes the universe to expand [2].

1. "Neutron Repulsion", The APEIRON Journal, in press (2011)

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

2. "Is the universe expanding?" The Journal of Cosmology 13, 4187-4190 (2011)

http://journalofc...102.html

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo
Video Summary (1961-2011)
http://dl.dropbox...reer.pdf
jsdarkdestruction
3.2 / 5 (5) Dec 01, 2011
Oliver Manuel's recent efforts to plaster Physorg.com and other public news sites with his theories and personal URLs are a bit puzzling, as scientists have a variety of publications available to communicate directly to each other in. My best guess is that he is desperately trying to prop up his legacy in light of his arrest in his university office on 7 charges of rape and sodomy based on allegations by 4 of his own children. The charges have been reduced to one count of felony attempted sodomy, not necessarily because of his innocence, but because of the statute of limitations. One can only guess how the recent charges and decades of family strife have affected his ability to reason rationally and to remain objective while defending his unpopular theories.

http://www.homefa...uel.html

http://mominer.ms...hildren/
Eoprime
not rated yet Dec 01, 2011
the evolving universe


Is either powered by:


Its c.)! Iam sure!
But i won't tell anyone what it is.

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