Rescuers trap hawk with nail in head in SF park

Oct 23, 2011
A wildlife rescue group captures a red-tailed hawk in a San Francisco park that appears to have been shot in the head with a nail gun. Rebecca Dmytryk, executive director of the Monterey-based group WildRescue, says the juvenile bird was trapped Saturday Oct. 22, 2011 shortly before sunset at the San Francisco Botanical Gardens. The bird was immediately transported to Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley in San Jose. (AP Photo/Katerine Ulrich - WildRescue)

(AP) -- A wildlife rescue group says it has captured a red-tailed hawk in a San Francisco park that appears to have been shot in the head with a nail gun.

Rebecca Dmytryk, executive director of the Monterey-based group WildRescue, says the juvenile bird was trapped Saturday shortly before sunset at the San Francisco Botanical Gardens.

There was no word on the bird's condition. A photo of the capture shows the bird being held by a rescuer. Dmytryk says it was immediately transported to Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley in San Jose.

WildRescue had been notified of the injured bird nearly a week ago and had tried to trap it several times last week without success.

believe someone intentionally hurt the earlier this month. A reward of $10,000 has been offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whomever harmed the bird.

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Isaacsname
not rated yet Oct 23, 2011
Pathetic, that's all I can say.
Feldagast
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 23, 2011
Eye for an Eye, give the perpetrator a nail to the head.
Jeddy_Mctedder
2 / 5 (4) Oct 23, 2011
these guys are helping a pigeon murderer. pigeon's are going to be outraged by this.
Pirouette
1 / 5 (2) Oct 23, 2011
It probably was someone in his/her teens that did that cruel act. I cannot see how an adult would take time out to put a nail into a bird's head, unless the adult was naturally sadistic. It's a terrible shame that there are such monsters in the world. All that can be done is to capture the monster and put him in a cell with a beefy, hardened animal lover. Guess what would, and should happen. :)
hush1
1 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2011
Yes. Nails are for humans. Believers will cite Jesus. Nails come in all forms and shapes. The original purpose of nails removed.
cees_timmerman
not rated yet Oct 24, 2011
Those who like to harm innocent life tend to not care about species.
hush1
1 / 5 (1) Oct 26, 2011
Those who like to harm innocent life tend to not care about the method.

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