Nanotechnology holds promise for safer breast implants

Oct 03, 2011

A new review published in WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology explores how nanotechnology may be used to develop safer breast implants as an alternative to silicone rubber, minimizing health complications.

Around 75% of post-mastectomy patients elect some form of breast reconstruction. The only material option available to women undergoing and augmentation is based on . While no medical device is 100% safe and effective, there is an extraordinarily high rate of complications reportedly attributed to silicone breast implants (20-30% - no other medical device has such a high failure rate), including increased incidence of systemic diseases, various forms of cancer, and psychological disease.

Lead review Author Judit E. Puskas, Ph.D., M.E., of The University of Akron, and researchers surveyed the literature on breast implants from the perspective of material science to determine how nanotechnology may enable the future development of safer breast implants.

By reducing the size of the components in nanostructured materials, unprecedented properties can be achieved. The Authors are currently developing an alternative nanostructured material to silicone rubber that will minimize complications.

The new material will also be able to deliver locally to improve the efficacy of treatment and minimize side effects associated with chemotherapy.

"If successful, our material could be used for implants with drug delivery capabilities," Puskas notes. "We are hoping that this review will contribute to a better understanding of the controversial issues and motivate material scientists and to work together to develop alternatives based on new nanotechnology for the women who opt for a device made of synthetic materials."

Explore further: Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New proteins detected on silicone breast implants

Dec 19, 2006

Scientists in Austria are reporting detection of previously unrecognized proteins that accumulate on the surface of silicone breast implants after implants are in the body. Georg Wick and colleagues say that the proteins ...

Canada OK's silicone gel implants

Oct 23, 2006

Canadian health officials have approved the use of silicone gel breast implants, 14 years after the government imposed a partial ban of the product.

FDA sees possible cancer risk with breast implants

Jan 26, 2011

(AP) -- Federal health officials said Wednesday they are investigating a possible link between breast implants and a very rare form of cancer after reviewing a handful of cases reported over the last 13 years.

FDA: Breast implant problems grow with time

Jun 22, 2011

Don't expect breast implants to last for life, the government warned Wednesday: About 1 in 5 women who receive them for cosmetic reasons will have them removed within 10 years, and those odds are even higher ...

Recommended for you

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair

Apr 18, 2014

A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur ...

Physicists create new nanoparticle for cancer therapy

Apr 16, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington physicist working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.