Space image: The Moon's North pole

September 8, 2011
Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Earth's moon has been an endless source of fascination for humanity for thousands of years. When at last Apollo 11 landed on the moon's surface in 1969, the crew found a desolate, lifeless orb, but one which still fascinates scientist and non-scientist alike.

This image of the moon's north was taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC.

One of the primary scientific objectives of LROC is to identify regions of permanent shadow and near-permanent illumination.

Since the start of the mission, LROC has acquired thousands of Wide Angle Camera images approaching the .

From these images, scientists produced this mosaic, which is composed of 983 images taken over a one month period during northern summer.

This mosaic shows the pole when it is best illuminated, regions that are in shadow are candidates for permanent shadow.

Explore further: Scientist to Work With NASA's Lunar Orbiter

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4 comments

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Mayday
not rated yet Sep 08, 2011
All these new higher-res images are awesome, but isn't the elephant in the room Zeeman? We've only been waiting decades.
yyz
not rated yet Sep 08, 2011
Zeeman is not in this image as it lies near the moon's *South* pole: http://en.wikiped...n_crater
Mayday
not rated yet Sep 08, 2011
Right. That is my point. The north pole is cool(no pun), but I think quite a few of us would rather see a high res of Zeeman. Unretouched, please.
Shootist
5 / 5 (2) Sep 08, 2011
Right. That is my point. The north pole is cool(no pun), but I think quite a few of us would rather see a high res of Zeeman. Unretouched, please.


Why? Nothing in the technical literature suggests anything special about Zeeman crater. Are you suggesting that we use Art Bell/George Noory/Richard Hoagland style 'science' to drive our research?

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