Scientists release most accurate simulation of the universe to date

Sep 29, 2011 By Tim Stephens
Bolshoi z=0

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Bolshoi supercomputer simulation, the most accurate and detailed large cosmological simulation run to date, gives physicists and astronomers a powerful new tool for understanding such cosmic mysteries as galaxy formation, dark matter, and dark energy.

The simulation traces the evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe, including the evolution and distribution of the dark matter halos in which galaxies coalesced and grew. Initial studies show good agreement between the simulation's predictions and astronomers' observations.

"In one sense, you might think the initial results are a little boring, because they basically show that our standard works," said Joel Primack, distinguished professor of physics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "What's exciting is that we now have this highly accurate simulation that will provide the basis for lots of important new studies in the months and years to come."


Bolshoi Simulation Visualization

Primack and Anatoly Klypin, professor of astronomy at New Mexico State University, lead the team that produced the Bolshoi simulation. Klypin wrote the computer code for the simulation, which was run on the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. "These huge cosmological simulations are essential for interpreting the results of ongoing astronomical observations and for planning the new large surveys of the universe that are expected to help determine the nature of the mysterious dark energy," Klypin said.

Primack, who directs the University of California High-Performance Astrocomputing Center (UC-HIPACC), said the initial release of data from the Bolshoi simulation began in early September. "We've released a lot of the data so that other astrophysicists can start to use it," he said. "So far it's less than one percent of the actual output, because the total output is so huge, but there will be additional releases in the future."

The previous benchmark for large-scale cosmological simulations, known as the Millennium Run, has been the basis for some 400 papers since 2005. But the fundamental parameters used as the input for the Millennium Run are now known to be inaccurate. Produced by the Virgo Consortium of mostly European scientists, the Millennium simulation used cosmological parameters based on the first release of data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). WMAP provided a detailed map of subtle variations in the cosmic microwave background radiation, the primordial radiation left over from the Big Bang. But the initial WMAP1 parameters have been superseded by subsequent releases: WMAP5 (five-year results released in 2008) and WMAP7 (seven-year results released in 2010).

The Bolshoi simulation is based on WMAP5 parameters, which are consistent with the later WMAP7 results. "The WMAP1 cosmological parameters on which the Millennium simulation is based are now known to be wrong," Primack said. "Moreover, advances in supercomputer technology allow us to do a much better simulation with higher resolution by almost an order of magnitude. So I expect the Bolshoi simulation will have a big impact on the field."

Bolshoi predictions agree with Observations

The standard explanation for how the universe evolved after the Big Bang is known as the Lambda Cold Dark Matter model, and it is the theoretical basis for the Bolshoi simulation. According to this model, gravity acted initially on slight density fluctuations present shortly after the Big Bang to pull together the first clumps of dark matter. These grew into larger and larger clumps through the hierarchical merging of smaller progenitors. Although the nature of dark matter remains a mystery, it accounts for about 82 percent of the matter in the universe. As a result, the evolution of structure in the universe has been driven by the gravitational interactions of dark matter. The ordinary matter that forms stars and planets has fallen into the "gravitational wells" created by clumps of dark matter, giving rise to galaxies in the centers of dark matter halos.

A principal purpose of the Bolshoi simulation is to compute and model the evolution of dark matter halos. The characteristics of the halos and subhalos in the Bolshoi simulation are presented in a paper that has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal and is now available online. The authors are Klypin, NMSU graduate student Sebastian Trujillo-Gomez, and Primack.

A second paper, also accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal and available online, presents the abundance and properties of galaxies predicted by the Bolshoi simulation of dark matter. The authors are Klypin, Trujillo-Gomez, Primack, and UCSC postdoctoral researcher Aaron Romanowsky. A comparison of the Bolshoi predictions with galaxy observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey showed very good agreement, according to Primack.

The Bolshoi simulation focused on a representative section of the universe, computing the evolution of a cubic volume measuring about one billion light-years on a side and following the interactions of 8.6 billion particles of . It took 6 million CPU-hours to run the full computation on the Pleiades supercomputer, recently ranked as the seventh fastest supercomputer in the world.

A variant of the Bolshoi simulation, known as BigBolshoi or MultiDark, was run on the same supercomputer with the same number of particles, but this time in a volume 64 times larger. BigBolshoi was run to predict the properties and distribution of galaxy clusters and other very large structures in the universe, as well as to help with dark energy projects such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS).

Another variant, called MiniBolshoi, is currently being run on the Pleiades supercomputer. MiniBolshoi focuses on a smaller portion of the universe and provides even higher resolution than Bolshoi. The Bolshoi simulation and its two variants will be made publicly available to astrophysical researchers worldwide in phases via the MultiDark Database, hosted by the Potsdam Astrophysics Institute in Germany and supported by grants from Spain and Germany.

Primack, Klypin, and their collaborators are continuing to analyze the results of the Bolshoi simulation and submit papers for publication. Among their findings are results showing that the correctly predicts the number of galaxies as bright as the Milky Way that have satellite as bright as the Milky Way's major satellites, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds.

"A lot more papers are on the way," Primack said.

Explore further: Measuring the proper motion of a galaxy

More information: hipacc.ucsc.edu/Bolshoi/

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User comments : 11

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DiverseByDesign
5 / 5 (5) Sep 29, 2011
Kind of disappointed by the video as presented. Just seems like a visual presentation of spinning galaxies and stars, not a simulation of the universe. I expected a simulation video of the universe chronologically. Maybe I just misunderstood the intentions.
omatranter
3.3 / 5 (4) Sep 29, 2011
""The WMAP1 cosmological parameters on which the Millennium simulation is based are now known to be wrong," Primack said""

yet 2005 they said this of the first run with bad data?

http://www.guardi...learning
"For the first time we have a replica universe which looks just like the real one"

makes you wonder?
omatranter
1.8 / 5 (5) Sep 29, 2011
"Prof Frenk said: "We programmed the biggest computer in Europe with these ingredients and the laws of physics and we just let it compute a universe. We let it churn away - in fact we shut down all science in Germany, we excluded all German science for a month while this very large machine ground away - and at the end we got this beautiful universe, which for all intents and purposes looks like the real thing." 2005
A2G
2.1 / 5 (7) Sep 29, 2011
Old rule may apply: Garbage in, garbage out.
TimESimmons
1.7 / 5 (6) Sep 29, 2011
we now have this highly accurate simulation

except for a complete absence of spiral galaxies. What could be missing from the simulation?

http://www.presto...ndex.htm
89118a
not rated yet Sep 29, 2011
OK, sounds good. However, no mention of Sloan Great Wall sized objects.

Wow, follow the video link for an even better video called Bolshoi II;

http://vimeo.com/29406342
grosyhpgrosyhpgrosyhp
5 / 5 (2) Sep 29, 2011
"Bolshoi" is "Big" in Russian. Good name for the supercomputer simulation of the universe =)
bewertow
3 / 5 (2) Sep 29, 2011
In the comments section: haters who are too dumb to study physics complain.
astro_optics
3 / 5 (2) Sep 29, 2011
didn't look like the BigBang to me!
omatumr
1.4 / 5 (10) Sep 29, 2011
The Bolshoi Supercomputer Simulation, the most accurate and detailed large cosmological simulation run to date, a powerful new tool for understanding such cosmic mysteries as galaxy formation, dark matter, and dark energy.


How did they decide BSS is "the most accurate cosmological simulation"?

Are BSS simulations better than experimental observations [1,2]?

1. "Is the Universe Expanding?", Journal of Cosmology 13, 4187-4190 (2011)

http://journalofc...102.html

2. "Neutron repulsion", The APEIRON Journal, in press (2011)

http://arxiv.org/...2.1499v1

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
http://myprofile....anuelo09
Sonhouse
5 / 5 (2) Sep 30, 2011
didn't look like the BigBang to me!

That would be because it ISN'T the BB, but starting at a point in time millions of years later.