Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy hit by cyberattacks

September 19, 2011

Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has been hit by cyberattacks with fears that its data on nuclear power plants or military-related products has been leaked, a newspaper reported on Monday.

The company found in mid-August that some 80 servers and computers of the nation's top heavy machinery manufacturer had been infected with computer viruses, according to the Yomiuri Shimbun.

The daily said the cyberattacks targeted the company's key plants in central and western Japan, where nuclear plants as well as submarines and missiles are produced.

Later in the day, Mitsubishi Heavy admitted some of its computers were infected by computer viruses, but said information related to its products or technology had not been leaked out.

Explore further: Japan's plutonium stockpile tops 43 tons

Related Stories

Britain looks at new nuclear plants

May 24, 2007

The British government says it will run out of power in the near future unless it increases its number of nuclear power plants in the country.

Repeat of SKorea, US cyberattacks does no damage

July 8, 2010

(AP) -- Hundreds of computers that caused a wave of outages on U.S. and South Korean government websites last July launched new attacks on the same sites, but no major damage was reported, police said Thursday.

World's first 'cyber superweapon' attacks China

September 30, 2010

A computer virus dubbed the world's "first cyber superweapon" by experts and which may have been designed to attack Iran's nuclear facilities has found a new target -- China.

Japan's Mitsui in quake-zone solar plan: report

July 6, 2011

Japanese trading house Mitsui plans to build large-scale solar power plants with the capacity to supply 30,000 households in the tsunami-hit northeast, a newspaper reported Wednesday.

Recommended for you

For these 'cyborgs', keys are so yesterday

September 4, 2015

Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago.

How to curb emissions? Put a price on carbon

September 3, 2015

Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions.

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

September 1, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.