Control gene for developmental timing discovered

Sep 28, 2011

University of Alberta researchers have identified a key regulator that controls the speed of development in the fruit fly. When the researchers blocked the function of this regulator, animals sped up their rate of development and reached maturity much faster than normal.

The U of A research team, led by molecular geneticist Kirst King-Jones, noticed a peculiar behaviour of the protein they were studying, DHR4: The protein acted as a sentinel to either allow or prohibit the production of steroid hormones by moving periodically between the to the cytoplasm.

In insects, these steroid hormone pulses control the progression of the fruit fly's development through the various stages of their life cycle. When the researchers blocked the function of DHR4 in the steroid hormone-producing cells, the maturation stage was reached 20 per cent faster than normal. In human terms this would mean that would be reached years earlier than normal.

In humans, steroid hormones play fundamental roles in the development of bodies and the onset of disease. King-Jones says the U of A research defines a novel mechanism by which steroid hormone pulses are regulated.

are commonly used in genetic research labs to study fundamental biological processes important for human health. The genes in many human diseases have a recognizable match in the genome of the fruit fly. For instance, the insect is used as a for diseases and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The fly is also a research tool for the study of obesity, diabetes and cancer.

Prior to the breakthrough by U of A researchers, little was known about the mechanism by which the timing of pulses, and thereby the onset of maturation, are controlled.

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More information: The U of A team's research was published online Sept. 27 in the journal PLoS Biology.

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Jeddy_Mctedder
1 / 5 (2) Sep 28, 2011
in a well known experiment fruit flies bread for longevity over many generations all had one one thing in common after the breeding other than longevity, they sexually matured later than fruitflies of average longevity.

it seems that perhaps we can infer that the causes of aging also are part of the causes of maturation. and it is possible, though not necessarily true, that if one could devise and test for a genetic mechanism that delays maturation to a later date, that the organism would also live longer or at least healthier , on average.

so is the research above going to be pickup up on by longevity researchers?