Marketing instructor predicts Olympic locales

Jul 13, 2011

Greg Dumont doesn't need a crystal ball to predict where the next Olympic Games will be held ... he has science on his side.

The University of Akron marketing instructor developed a model, as part of his doctoral dissertation, to discern which Olympic bidding criteria are most critical in differentiating a winning bid from competing alternatives. To do this, he analyzed competing bids for the 2008 Beijing Games, 2010 Vancouver Games, 2012 London Games, 2014 Sochi Games, 2016 Rio Games and 2018 Winter Games. His model accurately predicts the winning bid in five of the six aforementioned Olympiads while also predicting the voting results for the 2010, 2014, 2016 and 2018 in rank order.

The International Olympic Committee's July 6 announcement that Pyeongchang, South Korea, will be the host nation for the 2018 Winter Games further validated Dumont's model.

"The IOC's announcement both confirmed what my model predicted and justifies my confidence in this research as I prepare to defend my dissertation," Dumont says. "Outside of South Korea, I was probably the most excited individual to hear the IOC announcement.

"As more and more countries express interest in competing for the right to stage/host a finite number of global mega events, I am committed to revising the in an effort to better understand the unique bidding process of the FIFA World Cup, Commonwealth Games, political conventions and the like," he says.

Explore further: Christmas cracker pulling: How to send everyone home a winner

Provided by University of Akron

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Smithsonian holds vote on video games for exhibit

Feb 21, 2011

(AP) -- The Smithsonian American Art Museum is asking the public to help select video games that will be included in its first exhibit to explore the art and visual effects of gaming.

Message from space for Olympic athletes

Feb 27, 2006

From one international cooperation to another, the crew of the International Space Station (ISS), American William McArthur and Russian Valery Tokarev, yesterday congratulated the Olympic athletes gathered ...

An Olympic Forecast

Feb 15, 2010

The Vancouver Winter Olympics will not only challenge world-class athletes, but also a team of almost 100 meteorologists and atmospheric scientists tasked to provide the weather forecasts that keep the events ...

Recommended for you

Consumer loyalty driven by aesthetics over functionality

11 hours ago

When designing a new car, manufacturers might try to attract consumers with more horsepower, increased fuel efficiency or a lower price point. But new research from San Francisco State University shows consumers' loyalty ...

Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

13 hours ago

A new species of short-necked marine reptile from the Triassic period has been discovered in China, according to a study published December 17, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xiao-hong Chen f ...

Study: Alcatraz inmates could have survived escape

13 hours ago

The three prisoners who escaped from Alcatraz in one of the most famous and elaborate prison breaks in U.S. history could have survived and made it to land, scientists concluded in a recent study.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Squirrel
not rated yet Jul 13, 2011
So which did Greg Dumont get wrong of 2008 Beijing Games, 2010 Vancouver Games, 2012 London Games, 2014 Sochi Games, 2016 Rio Games and 2018 Winter Games?
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (1) Jul 13, 2011
he analyzed competing bids for the 2008 Beijing Games, 2010 Vancouver Games, 2012 London Games, 2014 Sochi Games, 2016 Rio Games and 2018 Winter Games. His model accurately predicts the winning bid in five of the six aforementioned Olympiads while also predicting the voting results for the 2010, 2014, 2016 and 2018 Olympics in rank order.

Is this a joke? That's not even close to a representative sample to give this analysis any kind of power. Not by a long shot.

And he got a PhD for this? Laughable. His statistics supervisor should have thrown it out on the spot (and if he passed it HE should have been sacked on the spot).

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.