Video: Revisiting 1950s experiments for signs of life's origin

June 6, 2011

( -- In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth.

Some unused samples from Miller’s research were recently uncovered by a team of scientists, including Jim Cleaves, of Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory. Their findings, carried out using modern techniques , indicate the possible importance of volcanoes and sulfur in the formation of amino acids, and possibly life, on earth.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

For more details:

Explore further: Could salt crusts be key ingredient in cooking up prebiotic molecules?

Related Stories

Shooting Meteorites in a Barrel

February 26, 2010

High-impact lab experiments simulate whether the building blocks of life could have survived the rough arrival on Earth via meteorite impact.

Did clay mould life's origins?

April 4, 2011

( -- An Oxford University scientist has taken our understanding of the origin of life a step further.

Recommended for you

Don't forget plankton in climate change models, says study

November 26, 2015

A new study from the University of Exeter, published in the journal Ecology Letters, found that phytoplankton - microscopic water-borne plants - can rapidly evolve tolerance to elevated water temperatures. Globally, phytoplankton ...

Can Paris pledges avert severe climate change?

November 26, 2015

More than 190 countries are meeting in Paris next week to create a durable framework for addressing climate change and to implement a process to reduce greenhouse gases over time. A key part of this agreement would be the ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.