Video: Revisiting 1950s experiments for signs of life's origin

Jun 06, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth.

Some unused samples from Miller’s research were recently uncovered by a team of scientists, including Jim Cleaves, of Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory. Their findings, carried out using modern techniques , indicate the possible importance of volcanoes and sulfur in the formation of amino acids, and possibly life, on earth.

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For more details: http://phys.org/news/2011-03-lost-samples-famous-life.html

Explore further: NASA sees Typhoon Matmo making second landfall in China

Provided by Carnegie Institution

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