Video: Revisiting 1950s experiments for signs of life's origin

Jun 06, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth.

Some unused samples from Miller’s research were recently uncovered by a team of scientists, including Jim Cleaves, of Carnegie’s Geophysical Laboratory. Their findings, carried out using modern techniques , indicate the possible importance of volcanoes and sulfur in the formation of amino acids, and possibly life, on earth.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

For more details: http://phys.org/news/2011-03-lost-samples-famous-life.html

Explore further: Lava creeps toward road on Hawaii's Big Island

Provided by Carnegie Institution

3 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Did clay mould life's origins?

Apr 04, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- An Oxford University scientist has taken our understanding of the origin of life a step further.

Shooting Meteorites in a Barrel

Feb 26, 2010

High-impact lab experiments simulate whether the building blocks of life could have survived the rough arrival on Earth via meteorite impact.

Recommended for you

Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot

Oct 24, 2014

Spectacular eruptions at Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland have been spewing lava continuously since Aug. 31. Massive amounts of erupting lava are connected to the destruction of supercontinents and ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous

Oct 24, 2014

NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the ...

User comments : 0