Renesas creates a near-field wireless communication with no battery use

Jun 16, 2011 by Katie Gatto weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- Renesas Electronics Corp has announced the development of a near-field wireless communication technology that can transmit data to Bluetooth- and wireless LAN-compatible devices without the use of a battery. The system instead makes use of the electricity generated by environmental radio waves.

The details of the project were announced at the 2011 Symposium on VLSI Circuits event, which took place at June 15th. Since the system does not require a battery, it has the capability of being used to create an ultra-small sensor node that could be used in a variety of applications and send data to a smart phone that is within a distance of one meter. The system could also be used with any Bluetooth- compatible device in range. This is possible because the system reduces the use of power from several tens of milliwatts to several microwatts, which represents a significant decrease in power.

In order to achieve that Renesas created a module that is equipped with an LC resonant circuit. The circuit allows the system to absorb radio waves through LC . The harvesting occurs at a rate of about 10μW from environmental radio waves. The can then be used to transmit the signal to mobile devices, allowing them to interpret the device as the sensor node sending "0" signals when it is on and "1" signals when the device is not transmitting.

While there is little to no information on when the device will be available to the consumer market. Though the company expects that it will be within the next two to three years.

Explore further: Lifting the brakes on fuel efficiency

More information:
via TechOn

Related Stories

Radio Waves: Alternative Power Source

Jul 20, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers at Duke University are harvesting ambient radio waves to power small microprocessor devices that consume very little energy. Devices such as sensors that monitor critical environmental ...

First self-powered device with wireless data transmission

Jun 15, 2011

Scientists are reporting development of the first self-powered nano-device that can transmit data wirelessly over long distances. In a study in ACS's journal Nano Letters, they say it proves the feasibility of a f ...

Imec achieves breakthrough in battery-less radios

Feb 09, 2010

At today's International Solid State Circuit Conference, Imec and Holst Centre report a 2.4GHz/915MHz wake-up receiver which consumes only 51µW power. This record low power achievement opens the door to battery-less ...

Toward computers that fit on a pen tip

Feb 22, 2011

A prototype implantable eye pressure monitor for glaucoma patients is believed to contain the first complete millimeter-scale computing system.

New WirelessUSB Radio-System-On-A-Chip Module Solutions

Jun 21, 2004

SAN JOSE, Calif., June 21, 2004 – Cypress Semiconductor Corp. and Unigen Corp. today jointly announced a family of 2.4 GHz wireless modules based on Cypress’s WirelessUSB(TM) technology. Unigen’s Juno(TM) module solutions, ...

Recommended for you

Lifting the brakes on fuel efficiency

Apr 18, 2014

The work of a research leader at Michigan Technological University is attracting attention from Michigan's Governor as well as automotive companies around the world. Xiaodi "Scott" Huang of Michigan Tech's ...

Large streams of data warn cars, banks and oil drillers

Apr 16, 2014

Better warning systems that alert motorists to a collision, make banks aware of the risk of losses on bad customers, and tell oil companies about potential problems with new drilling. This is the aim of AMIDST, the EU project ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gwrede
not rated yet Jun 17, 2011
While there is little to no information on when the device will be available to the consumer market.
and
Though the company expects that it will be within the next two to three years.
Is this really a serious website for literate grown-ups?

More news stories

Growing app industry has developers racing to keep up

Smartphone application developers say they are challenged by the glut of apps as well as the need to update their software to keep up with evolving phone technology, making creative pricing strategies essential to finding ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.