China announces Space Station plans

Apr 28, 2011 by Deborah Braconnier report
China announces Space Station plans
Image: China Daily

(PhysOrg.com) -- Less than a decade after launching their first astronaut into space, the China Manned Space Engineering Office announced in a news conference this week their plans to build and develop a 60-ton space station with three capsules and a cargo spacecraft.

The space station, much smaller than the which is 419 tons, will be comprised of three different modules. The core module will be 18.1 meters long, a diameter of 4.2 meters and will have a launch weight of between 20 and 22 tons. This module will be launched first, with the experiment modules launched to dock later. The experiment modules will be 14.4 meters long and will have the same launch weight and diameter as the core.

The cargo will have a maximum diameter of 3.35 and its launch weight will be less than 13 tons. This craft will be used to transport supplies and lab equipment to and from the space station.

Their current five year plan has them launching an unmanned module and spacecraft later this year to work on their docking technology, with the hopes of manned missions sometime next year.

Initial plans for the space station and its name were “Tiangog,” meaning heavenly palace. However, China’s Manned Space Engineering Office officials have announced they are turning to the public to submit names for the station and the cargo ship. Names for the cargo ship must be submitted by May20th and they plan to announce the final name sometime in June. Names for the space station can be submitted until July 25, with the name being chosen by the end of September.

With the development of this space station, China is also hoping to increase their international exchanges in the world’s space programs. Everything within their station will be compatible with that of the International and they are welcoming all space science researchers to participate.

According to reports, is also hoping to make its first landing on the moon within the next two years and the hope is to have an astronaut on the moon by 2025.

Explore further: Scientists find meteoritic evidence of Mars water reservoir

More information: via China Daily

Related Stories

Progress 25 docks at the space station

May 15, 2007

A Russian Progress spacecraft loaded with more than 2.5 tons of supplies and equipment docked with the International Space Station at 1:10 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

ISS crew gets ready for a delivery

May 10, 2007

The International Space Station crew was preparing for the arrival of a new Progress freighter spacecraft that will deliver more than 2.5 tons of supplies.

Russian cargo spacecraft nearing ISS

Jun 17, 2005

MOSCOW, June 17 (UPI) -- A Russian cargo spacecraft has been launched into orbit successfully and will reach the International Space Station Saturday, Russian space officials said.

Recommended for you

SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

4 hours ago

The sun emitted a mid-level flare on Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:58 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts ...

Why is Venus so horrible?

11 hours ago

Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you ...

Image: Christmas wrapping the Sentinel-3A antenna

14 hours ago

The moment a team of technicians, gowned like hospital surgeons, wraps the Sentinel-3A radar altimeter in multilayer insulation to protect it from the temperature extremes found in Earth orbit.

Video: Flying over Becquerel

14 hours ago

This latest release from the camera on ESA's Mars Express is a simulated flight over the Becquerel crater, showing large-scale deposits of sedimentary material.

Spinning up a dust devil on Mars

15 hours ago

Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

User comments : 28

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Eikka
2.9 / 5 (7) Apr 28, 2011
If only they'd figure out what to do with the ISS. Hanging around in LEO doesn't seem to go anywhere.

What are they doing up there anyways? Continuing to verify that yes, astronauts do experience muscle and bone loss under extended exposure to microgravity?
jimbo92107
not rated yet Apr 28, 2011
Why don't the Chinese simply take over the ISS? Wouldn't it be cheaper and a lot more efficient to repair and maintain an existing station? I can see building a new one if the ISS were some cramped little thing, but the ISS is enormous and spacious.
omatumr
1.5 / 5 (16) Apr 28, 2011
Thanks for this report.

This is a good reminder that the faltering economies and misguided leadership of the West do not represent a worldwide decline.

The US space program could still recover - if leaders of Western scientific organizations would address the experimental observations that showed Earth's global climate and our ultimate fates will be determined by Earth's unsteady heat source - not by CO2 from our once-productive economic engines:

1. Data from the Allende meteorite:

www.omatumr.com/D...Data.htm

2. Data from the Apollo moon samples

www.omatumr.com/D...Data.htm

3. Data from the Galileo Mission to Jupiter

www.omatumr.com/D...Data.htm

4. Nuclear rest mass data from Brookhaven Nat'l Lab

www.omatumr.com/D...Data.htm

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo

TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (15) Apr 28, 2011
If only they'd figure out what to do with the ISS. Hanging around in LEO doesn't seem to go anywhere.

What are they doing up there anyways? Continuing to verify that yes, astronauts do experience muscle and bone loss under extended exposure to microgravity?
I wonder this myself. But maybe theyre going to move it?
http://www.flight...lks.html

-It also provides a good platform for large vehicle assembly should the need arise, or be planned. A VASIMR engine onsite could possibly facilitate this.
Why don't the Chinese simply take over the ISS?
Its good to have redundancy. In case of disaster.
Jeddy_Mctedder
2.1 / 5 (7) Apr 28, 2011
this is a little too cold war from me. i usually have utmost respect for the chinese strategy, but it's as if they really are just as stupid as russia and the u.s.

can they NOT see where manned space flight leads? to bankrupting your space program and your country? to NO one caring anymore.

the future is in EXPORTS EXPORTS EXPORTS. if they can build crappy toys at 10% of the cost why can't they launch our sattelites for us at 10% the cost? if they could do that. they'd be making money instead of losing money on going to the moon. useless.
that_guy
3 / 5 (2) Apr 28, 2011
Reasons China wants their own space station:
1. National Pride
2. the iPhone 6 will be the only phone manufactured using apple's new patented 0g process. China is preparing to build a new foxconn factory.
3. It's a lot easier for china to put a giant laser on their own space station. The US would be a little uneasy if they put it on the ISS.
4. It's hard to be a protestor against china if you're 300 miles above the ground, and suddenly the communications "cut out".
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (5) Apr 28, 2011
"If only they'd figure out what to do with the ISS. Hanging around in LEO doesn't seem to go anywhere." - Eikka

The worthles space station is almost completed it's task of giving the worthless Space Shuttle something to do.

It is about time to dump the space station into the pacific.

It has been a job well done.

"What are they doing up there anyways?" - Eikka

Absolutely nothing.
Kulerucket
5 / 5 (2) Apr 28, 2011
Tin can space stations are yesterdays news. The future seems to be in inflatables.
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (3) Apr 28, 2011
"Why don't the Chinese simply take over the ISS?" - Jimbo

Because the ISS will soon be in the pacific ocean.

2016 is the scheduled date for dumping the ISS into the ocean.
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (2) Apr 28, 2011
"The future seems to be in inflatables." - Tin Can Tard

Absolutely. They are inflating all over the place. Thousands of them.

getgoa
3 / 5 (2) Apr 28, 2011
Space exploration is a large part of the future, and this space station can become an observed distance. The station should be name China Tech Space.
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (5) Apr 28, 2011
"Space exploration is a large part of the future" - GinkoTard

And which is being deorbited in 4 years.

I take it you believe the future won't last long.
warmer
4.2 / 5 (5) Apr 29, 2011
1st: omatumr I just checked your links and, the pun is intentional, what on earth does any of that data have to do with or in some way refute this single chart, ie. piece of widely agreed upon data http://www.wunder...oreT.gif

2nd: More space ships/rockets/stations only mean we're getting somewhere as a human race. Once you leave the planet, you kinda have to step back and go... Who are we to the rest of the universe? People of earth. That's that. I think it's a good thing if we try to keep our extra-planetary accomplishments on the positive. But humans being so satisfied to fight over the only hunk of granite we've got I won't hold my breath.
RobertKarlStonjek
not rated yet Apr 29, 2011
Neighbours in space!!! Who's going to be the first to pop next door for a cup of sugar??
Starbound
1 / 5 (3) Apr 29, 2011
@Warmer:

I feel that in a couple thousand years the last thing on the minds of our politicians will be preventing global warming. Call me whatever you like, but I KNOW that glaciation of the globe down to 45 latitude is probably going to be worse for humanity than a couple more degrees of temperature rise. Our current warm period is older than China or the Pyramids and looks like it will "soon" end. Oh well.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.9 / 5 (18) Apr 29, 2011
The worthles space station is almost completed it's task of giving the worthless Space Shuttle something to do.
You mean like your comments? They're pretty worthless.
Nydoc
5 / 5 (3) Apr 29, 2011
@Vendicar_Decarian Actually the ISS program has been extended until 2020. I wouldn't be surprised if it got extended again to 2025 or later.

See wikipedia: http://en.wikiped...it_plans
Kleo
5 / 5 (1) Apr 29, 2011
this is a little too cold war from me. i usually have utmost respect for the chinese strategy, but it's as if they really are just as stupid as russia and the u.s.

can they NOT see where manned space flight leads? to bankrupting your space program and your country? to NO one caring anymore.

the future is in EXPORTS EXPORTS EXPORTS. if they can build crappy toys at 10% of the cost why can't they launch our sattelites for us at 10% the cost? if they could do that. they'd be making money instead of losing money on going to the moon. useless.


The United States specifically forbids China the access of any satellite with U.S made components. By doing this China is basically blocked off international launch market. China would love to launch satellites for the U.S, in fact. The Long March rockets has an excellent safety track record. Some models have insofar achieve 100% success rates.
frajo
not rated yet Apr 30, 2011
The United States specifically forbids China the access of any satellite with U.S made components. By doing this China is basically blocked off international launch market.
This way the US (and its vassals in the NATO) are promoting Chinese progress. Which is just another example of history's irony.
Dummy
1 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2011
Wouldn't privatizing the space effort do the trick? Add a profit motive, get some venture capital flowing, etc?

Incidentally, In an ideal world, what SHOULD the US/Chinese/Russian/European, etc. space effort look like? What role should the military be involved? The Government? Private industry?
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (2) Apr 30, 2011
warmer:

The existing space station, and the crap design posted here for China's project, are utterly useless.

Even a NASA proposal for a "Spun" space station for simulated gravity was quickly improved upon conceptually by my self and others in simply observing that you can remove the need for a counter weight and double crew capacity all in one.

Manned spaceflight "for the hell of it" will always be pointless.

Practical manned spaceflight is suffering seriously from a total lack of creativity, vision, and purpose.

Without the discovery of some real resources and harvesting and manufacturing technologies to make use of them, manned spaceflight will always be pointless.

In order to make manned space flight practical, we need:

1) Bottom-up nanotechnology and nano-assembly.
2) Maximum nuclear and solar energy technologies.

We are currently spending almost nothing on researching either of those two keystone technologies.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.7 / 5 (15) May 01, 2011
The United States specifically forbids China the access of any satellite with U.S made components. By doing this China is basically blocked off international launch market.
This way the US (and its vassals in the NATO) are promoting Chinese progress. Which is just another example of history's irony.
Actually they are promoting healthy competition at the proper Time to spur a renewed effort to conquer space. Because technological innovation thrives on healthy competition, which can only occur in the presence of capitalism, either within it or against it. This is a Plan.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.5 / 5 (13) May 01, 2011
The existing space station, and the crap design posted here for China's project, are utterly useless.
Like most of your comments?
Even a NASA proposal for a "Spun" space station for simulated gravity was quickly improved upon conceptually by my self and others
Indeed you are the werner von braun of the space between your ears.

Maybe I should say something thread-relevent... Let me just reiterate that redundancy is essential to a robust space effort. Structures assembly in orbit gives valuable experience for future vehicles and industrial facilities, which could be applied at any time should an emergency arise. Either of these stations can serve as assembly bases for more complex engineering projects as wiki points out:
http://en.wikiped..._Station
Egleton
1 / 5 (2) May 02, 2011
Why are we in space? Let me think. . . GPS? Weather? Google Earth? Communications? Naa.. no reason to be in space. (Sheesh.)

Whoever colonises L1 or L2 slams the door on the rest. You Americans will escape your gravity well by invitation only.

I am reminded of the power that Britain's control of the ocean gave it in a bygone era.

You underestimate the Chinese at your peril.
frajo
not rated yet May 02, 2011
Whoever colonises L1 or L2 slams the door on the rest. You Americans will escape your gravity well by invitation only.

I am reminded of the power that Britain's control of the ocean gave it in a bygone era.

You underestimate the Chinese at your peril.
It is underestimating the Chinese (with several millennia of cultural experience) to assume that they will trample along the beaten path of Western Imperialism.
They are going to help stabilize a multipolar world. Bye bye to unipolar hegemony.
TheGhostofOtto1923
3.5 / 5 (13) May 02, 2011
Whoever colonises L1 or L2 slams the door on the rest. You Americans will escape your gravity well by invitation only.
Typical euro myopia. Not like the good ole days eh? Obama has stated the proper objective; the asteroid belt is truly the high ground. We will soon be looking down on your fragile inner system colonies amidst our vast quantities of raw materials and gibraltar-sized missiles. Benevolently.
Javinator
not rated yet May 02, 2011
Even a NASA proposal for a "Spun" space station for simulated gravity was quickly improved upon conceptually by my self


...aaaand you lost me
omatumr
1 / 5 (3) May 02, 2011
I feel that in a couple thousand years the last thing on the minds of our politicians will be preventing global warming. Call me whatever you like, but I KNOW that glaciation of the globe down to 45 latitude is probably going to be worse for humanity than a couple more degrees of temperature rise. Our current warm period is older than China or the Pyramids and looks like it will "soon" end.


You are right.

World leaders, Al Gore, and the UN's IPCC tricked an entire army of "Nobel Prize winning climatologists" into thinking Earth's climate and long-range weather are independent of the stormy Sun that heats the Earth, completely engulfs this planet Earth, and sustains our very lives.

Corruption of government science is a much greater threat than global warming.

Super-fluidity in the solar interior: Implications for solar eruptions and climate, Journal of Fusion Energy 21, 193-198 (2002).

http://arxiv.org/.../0501441

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.