Intel announces next in solid-state drive line up

Mar 01, 2011
Inside the Intel SSD 510 Series - This photo shows the flash memory inside the Intel SSD 510. Based on 34-nm NAND flash memory, the Intel SSD 510 Series delivers best-in-class sequential performance of up to 500MB/s sequential read speeds and 315 MB/s writes for its high-capacity model. The product is available now and comes in a 250GB capacity priced at $584 and a 120GB at $284, for 1,000 unit quantities.

Intel Corporation announced today the next in a line of new solid-state drives (SSD), the Intel Solid-State Drive 510 Series. The new Intel SSD 510 features fast SATA 6 Gigabits per second (Gbps) performance to take full advantage of Intel's transition to higher speed SATA bus interfaces on the recently introduced 2nd Generation Intel Core processor-based platforms. Supporting data transfers of up to 500 megabytes per second (MB/s), the Intel SSD 510 doubles the sequential read speeds, and at up to 315MB/s more than triples the sequential write speeds of Intel's current 3Gbps SSDs, to transfer more data in less time. This makes it ideal for demanding gamers, media creators, performance-intensive workstation users and any technology enthusiast.

The 510 offers the fastest sequential read and write speeds of any consumer SATA SSD available today, providing industry leading performance that beats a traditional (HDD) by more than 50 percent. In addition to better overall system responsiveness when compared to a mechanical hard drive, SSDs have no moving parts so are more rugged, consume less power and run quieter and cooler than HDDs. SSDs reduce boot times, launch applications and files faster and recover from quicker, resulting in noticeable improvement. Conventional HDDs are also unable to effectively take advantage of 6Gbps platform technology, since HDDs fail to maximize even the current 3Gbps SATA interface.

"The Intel SSD 510 Series helps round out our SSD product line and was specifically designed for applications that require high sequential media transfers," said Pete Hazen, director of marketing for Intel's NAND Solutions Group. "Whether it's a gamer wanting impeccable visual performance and faster game loading, or a performance-intensive workstation user, the new 6Gbps SATA SSD from Intel is not only significantly faster than the top 10,000 RPM gaming HDD, it's also faster than two RAIDed gaming HDDs."

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"As a game developer the number one thing we try to optimize during development isn't our game's memory usage or frames per second, but our content creator's iteration time," said Dave Lang, CEO of Iron Galaxy, a Chicago-based game development studio. "By transitioning our team to Intel's 6Gbps SSDs, we've seen a dramatic 15 to 20 percent improvement in the time it takes one of our developers to make a change in the editor, then get to try it out in-game. Faster iterations mean more iterations, which means a better game for the consumer."

The Intel SSD 510 Series uses proven Intel 34-nanometer NAND flash memory to deliver best-in-class sequential performance of up to 500MB/s sequential read speeds and up to 315 MB/s writes for its high-capacity model. The product is available now and comes in a 250GB capacity priced at $584 and a 120GB at $284, for 1,000-unit quantities. Both products include a limited 3-year warranty. The 120GB version is an excellent choice for dual-drive desktops, a hybrid configuration gaining in popularity. In this type of set up, the operating system, favorite applications and games are accessed from the SSD for faster boot up and accelerated application performance, while the HDD is used to store data.

In addition to solid reliability, Intel SSD purchasers have the benefit of the Intel SSD Toolbox with Intel SSD Optimizer, a free utility which provides Microsoft Windows users with a powerful set of management, information and diagnostic tools to help maintain the health and out-of-box performance of the drive. To help ease the installation process, all Intel SSD users can download the free Intel Data Migration Software to help clone the entire content of a previous storage drive (SSD or HDD) to any Intel SSD.

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Justavian
not rated yet Mar 01, 2011
These speeds are quite a bit lower than the kinds of read and write you can get with the OCZ Revo X-2. I realize that the interface is totally different - the Revo plugs into PCIE, and requires a motherboard that allows booting from that interface - but i'm a little disappointed that Intel hasn't pushed the limits a bit further.

That being said, i guess the fact that they're standard SATA means that you can RAID them all together - as i have in my own box with 2 X-25 E SLCs. For most home and small business uses, though, the Revo still seems like a more attractive offer.
soulman
1 / 5 (1) Mar 01, 2011
That's nice and all, but has the number of rewrite cycles improved in any way? Also, it's a pity that the price per GB is still so high.
Bob_Kob
1 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2011
Probably due to low competition methinks. Throw in another few manufacturers and theyll all be competing.

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