Global warming means more snowstorms: scientists

Mar 01, 2011
Workers remove snow from a runway at O'Hare International Airport on February 3, in Chicago, Illinois. Climate change is not only making the planet warmer, it is also making snowstorms stronger and more frequent, US scientists said on Tuesday.

Climate change is not only making the planet warmer, it is also making snowstorms stronger and more frequent, US scientists said on Tuesday.

"Heavy snowstorms are not inconsistent with a warming planet," said scientist Jeff Masters, as part of a conference call with reporters and colleagues convened by the Union of Concern Scientists.

"In fact, as the Earth gets warmer and more moisture gets absorbed into the atmosphere, we are steadily loading the dice in favor of more extreme storms in all seasons, capable of causing greater impacts on society."

Masters said that the northeastern United States has been coated in heavy snowfall from major Category Three storms or larger three times in each of the past two winters, storms that are unparalleled since the winter of 1960-61.

"If the climate continues to warm, we should expect an increase in heavy snow events for a few decades, until the climate grows so warm that we pass the point where it's too warm for it to snow heavily."

Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, said less in the Artic translates to more moisture in the atmosphere, and could also cause an pattern in polar regions known as Arctic Oscillation.

"It's still cutting-edge research and there's no smoking gun, but there's evidence that with less sea ice, you put a lot of heat from the ocean into the atmosphere, and the circulation of the atmosphere responds to that," Serreze said.

"We've seen a tendency for autumns with low sea ice cover to be followed by a negative Arctic Oscillation."

Even though spring in North America is just around the corner, Masters said more snow is on the way next week in the upper Midwest, and the melting pack could spark record floods in Minnesota, South Dakota and North Dakota this spring.

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Feldagast
2.5 / 5 (8) Mar 02, 2011
Ok let me get this right, now AGW is going to cause more snow, but they were saying it was going to cause less snow, then I remember them saying droughts, then more rain, in the 70's it was a prediction of a return to ice age.
The only thing for certain with these folks is the demand for more tax payer money for further research.
kivahut
2.1 / 5 (7) Mar 02, 2011
Seem like ex post facto law of AGW to me. I can see it now; the stock market crashes/rallies and it's because of Climate Change. Protesters win in Libya=Climate Change! Anal Wart=Climate Change!
GSwift7
3 / 5 (4) Mar 02, 2011
Oh, don't get all excited. This is just one opinion. There are many others. When two or more people are saying different things, only one of them can be right. Time will tell.
ted208
2 / 5 (4) Mar 02, 2011
What a crock. Global warming does not explain the coldest winter in years that we just had. It seems that global warming also means more snow, or less snow, more hurricanes, or less hurricanes etc. etc. etc. One size fits all. The good news is that most people don't believe in any of this.
It’s amazing. So the last four ice ages were actually caused by global warming?
These morons have now formulated a theory of AGW that can't be disproved no matter what happens.
Not enough snow--------blame global warming.
Too much snow-------blame global warming.
Drought----------blame global warming.
Too much rain---------blame global warming.
Too cold------------blame global warming.
Too hot------------blame global warming.
Got a bad case of prickly heat---------------blame global warming?

Never mind that NOAA recently said that the severe winter weather had nothing to do with global warming. Oh well. AGW nuts have never let the facts interfere with their beliefs.
moebiex
5 / 5 (1) Mar 03, 2011
Belief does not trump evidence, nor can it relegate reality to the imaginary. What "is" simply "is"- no matter what your belief or your interpretation. Evidence and logic are building in support of AGW- get over it. Denial on the basis of belief is like arguing that a 1,000 foot fall is not going to hurt you. Technically that's true, but that sudden stop at the end- ohhh.
Howhot
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 04, 2011
Good news ted208. You may be on to something.
Not enough snow--------blame global warming.
Too much snow-------blame global warming.
Drought----------blame global warming.
Too much rain---------blame global warming.
Too cold------------blame global warming.
Too hot------------blame global warming.
Got a bad case of prickly heat---------------blame global warming?

You got 100/100% correct.

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