Related topics: climate change · arctic · nasa · ice · satellite

Benthos in the Antarctic Weddell Sea in decline

Over the past quarter-century, changes in Antarctic sea-ice cover have had profound impacts on life on the ocean floor. As biologists from the Alfred Wegener Institute report in the latest issue of the journal Nature Communications, ...

Going against the trend: Cooling in the Southern Ocean

Climate and marine scientists are observing pervasive warming of the ocean and land surfaces across the globe. Since the middle of the 19th century, the average global temperature recorded on the land surface has risen by ...

Eurasian ice sheet collapse raised seas eight metres: study

The melting of the Eurasian ice sheet around 14,000 years ago lifted global sea levels by about eight metres, according to new research published Monday that highlights the risks of today's rapid ice cap melt.

page 1 from 100

Sea ice

Sea ice is formed from ocean water that freezes. Because the oceans consist of saltwater, this occurs at about -1.8 °C (28.8 °F).

Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean. Icebergs are compacted snow and hence fresh water.

Sea ice may be deliberately created or manipulated, see Arctic geoengineering for details.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA