Related topics: climate change · arctic · nasa · ice · satellite

CryoSat conquers ice on Arctic lakes

The rapidly changing climate in the Arctic is not only linked to melting glaciers and declining sea ice, but also to thinning ice on lakes. The presence of lake ice can be easily monitored by imaging sensors and standard ...

Walloped by heat wave, Greenland sees massive ice melt

The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic.

Researchers calculate soil freezing depth from satellite data

A team of researchers from the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), the Institute for Water and Environmental Problems of the Siberian Branch of RAS, and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology ...

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Sea ice

Sea ice is formed from ocean water that freezes. Because the oceans consist of saltwater, this occurs at about -1.8 °C (28.8 °F).

Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean. Icebergs are compacted snow and hence fresh water.

Sea ice may be deliberately created or manipulated, see Arctic geoengineering for details.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA