Related topics: climate change · arctic · nasa · ice · satellite

Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt

New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting ...

Arctic could face another scorching annus horribilis

Scientists say 2019 could be another annus horribilis for the Arctic with record temperatures already registered in Greenland—a giant melting icicle that threatens to submerge the world's coastal areas one day.

100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt

The Arctic is melting faster than we thought it would. In fact, Arctic ice extent is at a record low. When that happens—when a natural system behaves differently than scientists expect—it's time to take another look at ...

Why Cry for the Cryosphere?

The headline is actually a sentence that comes toward the end of Vanishing Ice, a new book that answers the question in encyclopedic detail. For those unfamiliar with the term, the cryosphere is the earth's natural ice ...

A warming Arctic produces weather extremes in our latitudes

Atmospheric researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have developed a climate model that can accurately depict the frequently observed winding course of the jet stream, ...

First ICESat-2 global data released: Ice, forests and more

More than a trillion new measurements of Earth's height—blanketing everything from glaciers in Greenland, to mangrove forests in Florida, to sea ice surrounding Antarctica—are now available to the public. With millions ...

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Sea ice

Sea ice is formed from ocean water that freezes. Because the oceans consist of saltwater, this occurs at about -1.8 °C (28.8 °F).

Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean. Icebergs are compacted snow and hence fresh water.

Sea ice may be deliberately created or manipulated, see Arctic geoengineering for details.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA