Image: Going supernova

Jan 14, 2011
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

While searching the skies for black holes using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, astronomers discovered a giant supernova that was smothered in its own dust.

In this artist's rendering, an outer shell of gas and dust -- which erupted from the star hundreds of years ago -- obscures the within.

This event in a distant galaxy hints at one possible future for the brightest star system in our own Milky Way.

Explore further: New technique for isolating sunny-day 'light' scattering could help illuminate Universe's birth

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