Lockheed Martin tests the advanced HULC robotic exoskeleton

October 28, 2010 By Heather Kelly

Lockheed Martin recently began laboratory testing of an improved next-generation design of its HULC advanced robotic exoskeleton. The testing brings HULC a step closer to readiness to support troops on the ground and others who must carry heavy loads.

HULC is an untethered, battery powered, hydraulic-actuated anthropomorphic capable of performing deep squats, crawls and upper-body lifting with minimal human exertion. It is designed to transfer the weight from heavy loads to the ground through the robotic legs of the lower-body exoskeleton, taking the weight off of the operator. An advanced onboard micro-computer ensures the exoskeleton moves in concert with the operator.

The ruggedized HULC system incorporates multiple design changes to increase reliability and performance in operational environments. New environmental sealing and packaging give the system’s electronics increased protection from natural elements and battlefield hazards. also leveraged commonly-used, military-standard rechargeable batteries to increase operational run time.

The testing now under way will validate the ruggedized system’s capabilities and reliability in a variety of simulated battlefield conditions. “Each of Lockheed Martin’s enhancements to the ruggedized HULC design was carefully planned to maintain peak system performance and alleviate physical burdens that can hinder the user’s mission success,” said Rich Russell, director of Sensors, Data Links and Advanced Programs at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. “The design improvements we implemented on the ruggedized exoskeleton prove our commitment to providing the Warfighter with an innovative solution that improves endurance and reduces the risk of injury.”

Lockheed Martin further refined the HULC’s form and fit, allowing the operator to adapt to the exoskeleton in less time. The ruggedized structure allows for rapid, repeatable adjustments to the torso and thigh length, without special tools, to better suit a wider variety of users. It also conforms to the body and incorporates lumbar padding for comfort and support. Additionally, the upgraded HULC features improved control software to better track the user’s movements.

Biomechanical, dynamic load and environmental verification evaluations of the ruggedized HULC are under way. Treadmill testing will measure anticipated decreases in metabolic cost as the HULC assists the user with heavy loads. Sand, wind, rain, temperature and humidity testing will replicate harsh environments and verify combat durability.

HULC is one of several technologies that Lockheed Martin is developing to support ground Soldiers. Lockheed Martin is a total systems solution provider to the military, including wearable situational awareness, a broad range of mobility assistance systems and power management systems. Lockheed Martin is also exploring exoskeleton designs to support industrial and medical applications.

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More information: www.lockheedmartin.com/products/hulc/index.html

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ArcainOne
not rated yet Oct 28, 2010
IRON MAN SHALL RISE! ... sorry I love this kind of technology.
JimB135
not rated yet Oct 28, 2010
This does sound really cool. Check out the click through video. I realize that this is simply an add for Lockheed Martin but it still looks cool. Could this help people with mobility problems?
Bob_B
3 / 5 (2) Oct 28, 2010
What is a "Warfighter?" A soldier? A paid war monger, otherwise called a mercenary?
jwalkeriii
not rated yet Oct 28, 2010
No new video makes this old news (rehash of last week)
patnclaire
1 / 5 (1) Oct 28, 2010
What is a "Warfighter?" A soldier? A paid war monger, otherwise called a mercenary?
Hello Bob. A Warfighter is a Politically Correct term used because Soldier, Sailor, Airman, and Marine had male connotations and we have two other sexes to include. So, in the interest of non-exclusivity, we use the term with the 'Bigger Tent' so that nobody will feel left out.
ArcainOne
not rated yet Oct 28, 2010
@Jim

I've seen similar tech being developed for disabled people. I know japan has something similar that was in the news not to long ago. This is the first US product I've seen that hasn't had a giant power cable plugged into it.
jsa09
not rated yet Oct 31, 2010
I think that when they get these things working the police forces will all be lining up to get them. The cops in our area are complaining of back problems because of all the equipment they have to lug around. Pistol, taser, cuffs, first aid kit, baton, torch and their wallet and maybe lunch money too.

I was going to mention the notorious brown paper bag but thought that might be going too far.

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