Indonesian volcano erupts again

September 6, 2010 By BINSAR BAKKARA , Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- An Indonesian volcano has shot black ash three miles (5,000 meters) into the air early - its most powerful eruption since springing back to life after four centuries of dormancy.

The force of Mount Sinabung's explosion could be felt five miles (eight kilometers) away.

The in North Sumatra province erupted for the first time since 1600 last week, catching many scientists off guard.

There are fears that current activity could foreshadow a much more destructive in a few weeks or months, though it is possible, too, that the mountain will go back to sleep after letting off steam.

More than 30,000 people living along Sinabung's fertile slopes have been relocated to cramped refugee camps, mosques and churches.

Explore further: Indonesian volcano evacuation ordered

0 shares

Related Stories

Indonesian volcano evacuation ordered

May 11, 2006

Indonesian officials have ordered the evacuation of about 17,000 residents of the island of Java as Mount Merapi spews more lava and poisonous smoke.

Villagers return to slopes of Indonesian volcano

August 31, 2010

(AP) -- Villagers briefly returned home Tuesday to check their farms along the fertile slopes of an Indonesian volcano that erupted after laying dormant for more than four centuries - catching many scientists off-guard.

Indonesian volcano spews new burst of ash

September 3, 2010

(AP) -- An Indonesian volcano that was quiet for four centuries shot a new, powerful burst of hot ash more than 10,000 feet (three kilometers) in the air Friday, sending frightened residents fleeing to safety for the second ...

Recommended for you

A cataclysmic event of a certain age

July 27, 2015

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago—give or take a few centuries—a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

July 28, 2015

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.