Internet addicts stage uprising at China boot camp

June 8, 2010
A group of young Chinese web addicts have staged a mutiny at an Internet "boot camp", tying up their instructor and fleeing the facility over its tough military-like techniques, according to state media. The 14 mutineers, aged 15 to 22, were all caught by police when they failed to pay a taxi fare following their escape from the rehabilitation centre in east China's Jiangsu province.

A group of young Chinese web addicts staged a mutiny at an Internet "boot camp", tying up their instructor and fleeing the facility over its tough military-like techniques, state media said Tuesday.

The 14 mutineers, aged 15 to 22, were all caught by police when they failed to pay a taxi fare following their escape from the rehabilitation centre in east China's Jiangsu province last week, the Global Times said.

They had tied up their supervisor in his bed to allow them to escape the "monotonous work and intensive training" at the camp, it said.

Parents of 13 of the have already sent them back to the Huai'an Treatment Centre after picking them up at a local police station, the paper said.

"We need to teach them some discipline and help them to establish a regular lifestyle," the paper quoted an employee at the camp as saying.

"We have to use military-style methods such as total immersion and physical training on these young people."

Last month, a court in the southern region of Guangxi sentenced two Internet boot camp instructors to up to 10 years in prison after a 15-year-old addict was beaten to death at the facility.

The August 2009 death followed a string of abuse reported by state media at numerous unregistered Internet treatment centres around China.

According to the China Youth Association for Network Development, there are up to 24 million Chinese adolescents addicted to the Internet, with up to half of them obsessed by online gaming, the Global Times said.

The government said in a white paper on the Internet released Tuesday that it was committed to the "online safety" of minors, noting that it would take measures to keep young people from "overindulging in the Internet".

Explore further: IPv6: Challenge to Internet freedom?

Related Stories

IPv6: Challenge to Internet freedom?

March 20, 2006

A China-backed Internet technical standard reportedly might allow the traceability of Internet users, especially those opposing government policies.

China cracks down on online games: report

December 25, 2009

China has placed more than 4.65 million computers at some 80,000 Internet cafes under watch in a bid to crack down on violent or pornographic online games, state media reported Friday.

Recommended for you

Team develops targeted drug delivery to lung

September 2, 2015

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes of drugs into the lung. Their approach, in which micro-liters ...

Not another new phone! But Nextbit's Robin is smarter

September 2, 2015

San Francisco-based Nextbit wants you to meet Robin, which they consider as the smarter smartphone. Their premise is that no one is making a smart smartphone; when you get so big it's hard to see the forest through the trees. ...

Team creates functional ultrathin solar cells

August 27, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an ultrathin solar cell for use in lightweight and flexible applications. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, ...

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

September 1, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.