Robotic cell phones express emotions (w/ Video)

May 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Ji-Dong Yim and Chris Shaw, scientists in Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), are the proud parents of a robotic cell phone family that can walk, dance and express human-like emotions.

Yim, a doctoral student, and Shaw, an associate professor, first used cell phone technology to create Cally, a physically active robotic cell phone that stands roughly 16 centimeters high. She walks, dances and mimics human gestures. She can also help cell phone users make electronic eye contact with the person to whom they are talking by tracking human faces.

The SIAT researchers have most recently used , text messaging and other interactive technologies to give birth to Callo. He is taller (almost 23 centimeters) and more emotionally sophisticated than his older sister.

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Callo’s viewing screen registers text-messaged emoticons as human-like . His robotic shoulders can slump and his arms can start waving frantically if he’s interactively triggered to respond to an emotional crisis, such as relationship break up.

“Imagine you are video-calling with me through Callo,” explains Yim. “When you move your robot, my robot will move the same, and vice versa, so that we can share using ‘physically smart’ phones.”

Shaw, Yim’s doctoral supervisor, says the two are developing a wide range of human-robot service scenarios and prototypes of Cally, Callo and their siblings. He adds, “We’re using them to explore ways in which we can help social robotic products, such as GPS, interactively communicate with people and build long-term intimacy with them.”

Explore further: New 'deep learning' technique enables robot mastery of skills via trial and error

More information:
-- Designing CALLY, a Cell-phone Robot, Ji-Dong Yim and Chris Shaw, Proceedings of CHI'09 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Design Practice, Boston, MA, Apr. 4-9, 2009, 4 pages, doi.acm.org/10.1145/1520340.1520378
-- CALLY: The Cell-phone Robot with Affective Expressions, Ji-Dong Yim and Chris Shaw, Late breaking poster in HRI'09, La Jolla, CA, Mar. 11-13, 2009, 2 pages, portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1514095.1514195

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User comments : 3

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Oliver_k_Manuel
not rated yet May 04, 2010
cell phone that stands roughly 16 metres high !!!!!, !!! holy cow.
Oliver_k_Manuel
not rated yet May 04, 2010
correct me if im wrong but does that mean callo is 16 meters 23 centimeters tall?
HealingMindN
not rated yet May 04, 2010
Instead of this animatronic thingy, what about an LCD projector, so we can project the other person's face on a surface and see their faces with real emotions and all that?

If it has to be a robot interface, what about retrofitting a few roller coasters and other thrill rides with cellphone control interfaces? Then the person on the other end can really show you how they feel...

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