Identifying molecular targets for diabetes-related ED

April 6, 2010

Erectile dysfunction is one of the most prevalent diabetes-induced complications in men; current estimates suggest that as many as 75% of men with diabetes will develop some degree of ED, and in many cases diabetics develop more severe forms of ED that are less responsive to standard drugs.

Now, in a study appearing in the March Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Albert Einstein College of Medicine have identified some of the molecular changes that accompany the onset of diabetes-induced ED, which may lead to markers that will help identify ED risk as well as new potential drug targets.

Mark Chance and colleagues used a proteomics approach to examine the relative abundance of proteins in the corpora (the expandable tissues along the length of the penis which fill with blood during erection) of diabetic rats at two different stages of progression: one week and two months after the onset of diabetes. By comparing these rats to healthy age-matched controls, they identified 57 proteins in the penile tissue that either increased or decreased during diabetes.

The candidate proteins revealed insights into the mechanics of ED; perhaps not surprisingly, collagen proteins that provide strength and stiffness were down-regulated in diabetes, as were proteins that transport sex hormones. Meanwhile, proteins involved in () were up-regulated, as were many proteins related to fat metabolism, changes that might be related to narrowing or hardening of blood vessels.

Chance and colleagues note that the they used in the study mimics many relevant features of human ED, and thus the identification of these 57 candidate proteins could open up further and more detailed studies into the relationship between and ED in humans, and also lead to diagnostic and drug targets.

Explore further: Study of gene transfer for erectile dysfunction shows promise

More information: Article Link: mcponline.org/content/9/3/565.full

Related Stories

Study of gene transfer for erectile dysfunction shows promise

November 30, 2006

The first human study using gene transfer to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) shows promising results and suggests the potential for using the technology to treat overactive bladder, irritable bowel syndrome and asthma, according ...

Erectile dysfunction influenced by race and ethnicity

January 31, 2007

According to a new study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine, erectile dysfunction (ED) is highly prevalent across white, black and Hispanic populations in the United States. For the first time in an adequately-sized, nationally ...

Advance toward first saliva test for Type 2 diabetes

January 19, 2009

Scientists in Oregon and India are reporting an advance toward developing the first saliva test to diagnose and monitor effectiveness of treatment for Type 2 diabetes. Their report was published in the Jan. 2 issue of ACS' ...

Recommended for you

Brazilian wasp venom kills cancer cells by opening them up

September 1, 2015

The social wasp Polybia paulista protects itself against predators by producing venom known to contain a powerful cancer-fighting ingredient. A Biophysical Journal study published September 1 reveals exactly how the venom's ...

Naturally-occurring protein enables slower-melting ice cream

August 31, 2015

(Phys.org)—Scientists have developed a slower-melting ice cream—consider the advantages the next time a hot summer day turns your child's cone with its dream-like mound of orange, vanilla and lemon swirls with chocolate ...

Antibody-making bacteria promise drug development

August 31, 2015

Monoclonal antibodies, proteins that bind to and destroy foreign invaders in our bodies, routinely are used as therapeutic agents to fight a wide range of maladies including breast cancer, leukemia, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.