NASA Announces Screening of Space Shuttle Artifacts

September 14, 2009

NASA is inviting eligible educational institutions, museums and other organizations to begin registering to screen potential space shuttle artifacts.

NASA is inviting eligible educational institutions, museums and other organizations to begin registering to screen potential artifacts.

The artifacts represent significant human spaceflight technologies, processes and accomplishments of the shuttle program. More information about the types of artifacts that may be available is included in a brochure, "Space Shuttle Program Artifacts," located at: .

To ensure broad access to potential shuttle artifacts, NASA partnered with the General Services Administration to provide a first of its kind, Web-based electronic artifacts prescreening capability. The Web-based artifacts prescreening module may be accessed at: .

Only a few hundred items will be initially screened, but thousands of other items will be added periodically until all artifacts have been screened. Each artifact will be screened for 90 days. Once the screening period closes, requestors will be notified about the status of their request.

Museum and school officials must first be determined as eligible through an online registration process or through the State Agency for Surplus Property in their state. Eligible recipients may view the available artifacts and request specific items at the Web site. Prescreening allows potential recipients to identify specific items and provides the time to plan to transport, preserve and properly display artifacts.

Requesting an artifact through the prescreening process does not guarantee the item will be available or when it will become available. Artifacts will be incrementally released, as they are no longer needed by the Space Shuttle Program, and in accordance with export control laws and regulations.

The are free. However, eligible recipients must cover shipping costs and any special handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive, while larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs.

NASA will work closely with potential recipients, on a case by case basis, to address any unique special handling costs.

Provided by JPL/NASA (news : web)

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