Science publishers offer journals for free to poorest countries

July 23, 2009
Science and technology journal publishers have agreed to offer free access to their journals to academics in the world's poorest countries, the World Intellectual Property Organization said Thursday.

Science and technology journal publishers have agreed to offer free access to their journals to academics in the world's poorest countries, the World Intellectual Property Organization said Thursday.

Twelve publishers including the Oxford University Press, Elsevier and the National Academy of Sciences have agreed to grant free access to about 64 journals to research and academic institutions and intellectual property offices in almost 50 countries.

Another 58 developing countries would also get access by paying an annual subscription of 1,000 dollars a year, against the regular annual subscription fee of over 400,000 dollars.

Bangladesh Minister for Industries Dilip Barua, whose country would be among those to benefit, highlighted the importance of gaining access to technology information.

"Least Developed Countries need to have access to technological know-how that can help them build a knowledge base to address the challenges in public health and education, enterprise development, poverty alleviation and sustainability of economic development, climate change and other areas," he said.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: WTO extends intellectual property deadline

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RayCherry
not rated yet Jul 24, 2009
Finally. Great news.

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