Facebook, like MySpace, lets users show full name

June 10, 2009

(AP) -- Facebook is further embracing the real name culture it touts as one of its founding principles - and catching up with rival MySpace in the process.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. EDT on Saturday, the popular online hangout's millions of users will be able to claim a name to use as part of their profile page's Web address - as in http://facebook.com/janedoe . Currently Facebook assigns each profile a string of numerals.

Fan pages for businesses, brands and celebrities will be able to adopt such names, too.

Facebook says people will be able to choose the names on a first-come, first-served basis.

In doing this, is playing catch-up with News Corp.-owned , which has let its users pick their own monikers since its 2004 launch.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Evite rival Socializr launches events aggregator

Related Stories

Evite rival Socializr launches events aggregator

April 15, 2009

(AP) -- Socializr, the online invitations startup from Friendster founder Jonathan Abrams, now helps users manage their events from sites like Facebook, MySpace, Evite and Meetup.

News Corp. hires more MySpace executives

April 27, 2009

(AP) -- News Corp. has hired two new executives at MySpace, expanding the online hangout's management team after having just replaced its CEO on Friday.

MySpace's new CEO promises innovation

May 28, 2009

(AP) -- The new leaders of News Corp.'s MySpace said Wednesday they need to innovate to rejuvenate the social networking site, which has suffered from stalled user growth.

Recommended for you

The ethics of robot love

November 25, 2015

There was to have been a conference in Malaysia last week called Love and Sex with Robots but it was cancelled. Malaysian police branded it "illegal" and "ridiculous". "There is nothing scientific about sex with robots," ...

No lens? No problem for FlatCam

November 23, 2015

How thin can a camera be? Very, say Rice University researchers who have developed patented prototypes of their technological breakthrough.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.