Facebook, like MySpace, lets users show full name

June 10, 2009

(AP) -- Facebook is further embracing the real name culture it touts as one of its founding principles - and catching up with rival MySpace in the process.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. EDT on Saturday, the popular online hangout's millions of users will be able to claim a name to use as part of their profile page's Web address - as in http://facebook.com/janedoe . Currently Facebook assigns each profile a string of numerals.

Fan pages for businesses, brands and celebrities will be able to adopt such names, too.

Facebook says people will be able to choose the names on a first-come, first-served basis.

In doing this, is playing catch-up with News Corp.-owned , which has let its users pick their own monikers since its 2004 launch.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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