Improved satellite navigation for remote areas

Aug 22, 2008
Improved satellite navigation for remote areas
An artist's impression of the European Space Agency's GIOVE-A navigation satellite. Image credit – European Space Agency

CSIRO scientists with the Minerals Down Under National Research Flagship are working closely with industry and government to develop vastly improved navigation technology for remote areas.

Better navigation is critical for the safety of remote workers, and to support productivity improvements within the mining industry.

The research project will develop two new Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technologies.

The first system is an integrated GNSS receiver that receives signals from several satellite constellations as well as inputs from other sources. It will provide more accurate navigation and will be suitable for mass-market applications.

The second system is a GNSS transponder that works with the receiver to automatically communicate the location of the user.

CSIRO Project manager, Dr Garry Einicke, said the new technologies are targeted at a global niche market that is particularly important to Queensland.

“They will support improved management of personnel safety, traffic management, collision avoidance and the improved efficiency of haul truck operations at mine sites,” he said.

“They will also help develop workforce management systems to provide increased security for workers in remote areas such as Queensland’s outback and Piemonte’s Alpine regions in Italy.”

Source: CSIRO

Explore further: Our new anti-earthquake technology could protect cities from destruction

Related Stories

Researchers finding applications for tough spinel ceramic

Apr 24, 2015

Imagine a glass window that's tough like armor, a camera lens that doesn't get scratched in a sand storm, or a smart phone that doesn't break when dropped. Except it's not glass, it's a special ceramic called ...

How fish fossils can help us build better submarines

Apr 23, 2015

The ocean, which covers the vast majority of the world's surface, holds many secrets. For more than a year a multinational team has tried to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on the bottom of ...

Recommended for you

Focused energy of lasers breaks microscopic adhesion

23 hours ago

Small objects tend to cling to everything. It's why parents dread hosting parties that involve confetti. It's why glitter is fun for crafts—until it finds its way onto everything else you touch.

Insect decoys could protect ash trees

Jul 02, 2015

Emerald ash borers have no trouble reproducing themselves as they have now spread through half the United States, but duplicating effective emerald ash borer decoys is not quite as easy. Now, engineers have ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.