NASA tests moon orbiter components

January 12, 2008

U.S. engineers are testing the components of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to make sure it is ready for its mission to the moon.

The LRO will spend at least a year mapping the surface of the moon. Data from the orbiter will be used to help NASA select safe landing sites for astronauts, identify lunar resources and study how the moon's environment will affect humans, the agency said Friday in a release.

The spacecraft will ship from Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., in August in preparation for launch. The orbiter and the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite will launch aboard an Atlas V rocket in late 2008, NASA said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: LRO discovers Earth's pull is 'massaging' our moon

Related Stories

LRO discovers Earth's pull is 'massaging' our moon

September 15, 2015

Earth's gravity has influenced the orientation of thousands of faults that form in the lunar surface as the moon shrinks, according to new results from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft.

Fact over fiction on the 'apocalyptic' super blood moon

September 25, 2015

For many people, the sight of the moon turning deep red – some would say blood red – during a lunar eclipse is a wonderful sight. And that's precisely what many millions of sky gazers will be able to see this Sunday or ...

The moon

September 21, 2015

Look up in the night sky. On a clear night, if you're lucky, you'll catch a glimpse of the moon shining in all it's glory. As Earth's only satellite, the moon has orbited our planet for over three and a half billion years. ...

Recommended for you

Blue skies, frozen water detected on Pluto

October 8, 2015

Pluto has blue skies and patches of frozen water, according to the latest data out Thursday from NASA's unmanned New Horizons probe, which made a historic flyby of the dwarf planet in July.

Orbiter views Mars surface fractures

October 8, 2015

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter often takes images of Martian sand dunes to study the mobile soils. These images provide information about erosion and ...

How to prepare for Mars? NASA consults Navy sub force

October 5, 2015

As NASA contemplates a manned voyage to Mars and the effects missions deeper into space could have on astronauts, it's tapping research from another outfit with experience sending people to the deep: the U.S. Navy submarine ...


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

1 / 5 (3) Jan 12, 2008
Didn't they supposedly land on the moon almost 40 years ago?

Why is it that they're acting like they've never done this before?

why is it that for the past 20 years they can't even launch a spacecraft on schedule and bring the crew back alive.

Didn't they supposedly already have like 10 or 11 people on the moon? And claim they still have vehicles and instruments on the moon? They ought to aready know what the environment is like on the moon.

5 / 5 (1) Jan 19, 2008
Take your meds and have a nap.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.