Atlantis To Move To Launch Pad Saturday

November 7, 2007
Atlantis viewed from the ISS

Space shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Saturday, Nov. 10, as preparations for the STS-122 mission move forward.

Atlantis is targeted to lift off Dec. 6 on an 11-day mission to the International Space Station.

The first motion of the shuttle out of Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building is scheduled for 4 a.m. EST. The 3.4-mile journey to the launch pad is expected to take about six hours.

NASA Television will provide a live picture of Atlantis at the launch pad beginning at 6:30 a.m. Video highlights of the rollout will air on NASA TV's Video File segments.

Source: NASA

Explore further: NASA checks for damage after possible lightning

Related Stories

NASA checks for damage after possible lightning

July 7, 2011

Thunderstorms threatened to delay NASA's last space shuttle launch set for Friday with lightning striking near the pad as astronauts descended on Cape Canaveral by the dozens on the eve of the historic flight.

NASA rolls out shuttle Atlantis for final time

June 1, 2011

The US space agency sent its last shuttle, Atlantis, out to the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center so it can prepare for the final launch of the American shuttle program in July.

Shuttle Atlantis blasts off on last Hubble mission

May 11, 2009

(AP) -- Space shuttle Atlantis and a crew of seven thundered away Monday on one last flight to the Hubble Space Telescope, setting off on an extraordinarily ambitious repair mission that NASA hopes will lift the celebrated ...

Shuttle Atlantis Rolls to Launch Pad for Hubble Mission

September 4, 2008

At 9:19 a.m. EDT this morning, space shuttle Atlantis began its slow trek from Kennedy Space Center's massive Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A, a journey that should take approximately six hours.

Recommended for you

Dense star clusters shown to be binary black hole factories

July 29, 2015

The coalescence of two black holes—a very violent and exotic event—is one of the most sought-after observations of modern astronomy. But, as these mergers emit no light of any kind, finding such elusive events has been ...

Image: Hubble sees a dying star's final moments

July 31, 2015

A dying star's final moments are captured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The death throes of this star may only last mere moments on a cosmological timescale, but this star's demise is still quite ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.